access Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “access” in the English Dictionary

"access" in British English

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accessnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈæk.ses/

access noun [U] (GETTING NEAR)

B1 the ​method or ​possibility of getting near to a ​place or ​person: The only access to the ​village is by ​boat. The ​main access to (= ​entrance to) the ​building is at the ​side. The children's ​father was refused access to them at any ​time (= ​refusedofficialpermission to ​see them).
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access noun [U] (RIGHT)

B1 the ​right or ​opportunity to use or ​look at something: The ​system has been ​designed to give the ​userquick and ​easy access to the ​requiredinformation. Hackers had/​gainedcomplete access to the ​companyfiles.

accessverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈæk.ses/
B2 to ​open a ​computer file (= a ​collection of ​informationstored on a ​computer) in ​order to ​look at or ​changeinformation in it
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(Definition of access from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"access" in American English

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accessnoun [U]

 us   /ˈæk·ses/
the ​method or way of ​approaching a ​place or ​person, or the ​right to use or ​look at something: Without an ​officialpass, the ​guards will ​deny you access to (= will not ​let you ​enter) the ​courthouse. Access to something can also ​mean the ​opportunity or ​ability to use it: Many of the ​families do not have access to ​healthcare.

accessverb [T]

 us   /ˈæk·ses/
to get ​information, esp. when using a ​computer: People now can access ​information from the ​Internet as never before.
(Definition of access from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"access" in Business English

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accessnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈækses/
the ​right or ​opportunity to use or receive something: get/have/provide access to sth Community radio ​stations have access to ​publicfunding. Everyone is ​entitled to fair access toemployment.
the ​right or ​ability to ​look at ​documents and ​information: allow/grant/give sb access to sth She was ​granted access to the ​officialarchives.gain access to sth You can ​gain access to your ​records via this ​website.deny/restrict access to sth They ​planned to ​restrict access to their ​websitecontent with the use of a ​subscriptionsystem. Merchants have online access to their ​productdata. Auditors have unrestricted access to all ​records.
IT the ​ability to use a ​system such as the ​internet, or the way in which you can do this: access to sth Do you have access to the ​internet? Business ​travellers expect ​free internet access. broadband/​wireless access
the ​method or possibility of getting to or ​entering a ​place: access to sth The ​site has easy access to the motorway. The ​premises are ​equipped for disabled access.
COMMERCE the ​right or ​ability to ​buy and ​sellgoods in a particular country or ​market: access to sth Our ​website gives us access to ​globalmarkets.
BANKING the ​right to use a ​bankaccount, or to ​removemoney from a ​bankaccount or an ​investment: access to sth Some ​accountsallow instant access to your ​savings.
LAW the ​legalright to see your child or children, or other family ​member, especially after a divorce: access to sb Many fathers go to ​court to ​seek access to their children.

accessverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈækses/
IT to ​open a ​computerfile or to use a ​computersystem such as the ​internet: Many ​users now access the ​internet via their ​mobilephones. I can access my ​emailremotely.
BANKING to ​look at a ​bankaccount, and be able to ​movemoney into or out of it: You can access your ​accountonline or by ​phone.
to be able to get or use something, especially a ​service: We ​advisestaff on how to access appropriate ​training.
(Definition of access from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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