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Meaning of “accidental” in the English Dictionary

"accidental" in British English

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accidentaladjective

uk   /ˌæk.sɪˈden.təl/  us   /ˌæk.səˈden.t̬əl/
B2 happening by ​chance: Reports ​suggest that eleven ​soldiers were ​killed by accidental ​fire from ​their own ​side. The ​site was ​located after the accidental ​discovery of ​bones in a ​field.

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accidentalnoun [C]

uk   /ˌæk.sɪˈden.təl/  us   /ˌæk.səˈden.t̬əl/
  • accidental noun [C] (BIRD)

specialized biology a ​bird that is ​found in a ​place where ​birds of ​itstype are not usually ​found : You may ​spot accidentals ​driven in by the ​stormyweather.
(Definition of accidental from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “accidental”
in Arabic عَرَضي…
in Korean 우연한…
in Portuguese acidental…
in Catalan fortuït, imprevist…
in Japanese 間違いによる, 不測の, 思いがけない…
in Chinese (Simplified) 偶然的, 意外的…
in Turkish kazara, istemeden olan, meydana gelen…
in Russian случайный…
in Chinese (Traditional) 偶然的, 意外的…
in Italian accidentale, casuale…
in Polish przypadkowy…
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More meanings of “accidental”

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