Meaning of “accuse” in the English Dictionary

"accuse" in British English

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accuseverb [ T ]

uk /əˈkjuːz/ us /əˈkjuːz/

B2 to say that someone has done something morally wrong, illegal, or unkind:

"It wasn't my fault." "Don't worry, I'm not accusing you."
He's been accused of robbery/murder.
Are you accusing me of lying?
The surgeon was accused of negligence.
stand accused of sth formal

If you stand accused of doing something wrong, people say that you have done it:

More examples

  • She's been accused of acting dishonestly.
  • She accused her employer of sex discrimination .
  • He's been accused of robbery/murder.
  • Are you accusing me of lying?
  • "It wasn't my fault." "Don't worry, I'm not accusing you."
accuser
noun [ C ] uk /əˈkjuː.zər/ us /əˈkjuː.zɚ/

She was given the chance to face her accusers.

(Definition of “accuse” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"accuse" in American English

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accuseverb [ T ]

us /əˈkjuz/

to say that someone is responsible for a crime or for having done something wrong:

He was accused of failing to pay his taxes.
She accused me of lying.
accusation
noun [ C ] us /ˌæk·jəˈzeɪ·ʃən/

He denied the accusation, saying he was innocent.

(Definition of “accuse” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"accuse" in Business English

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accuseverb [ T ]

uk /əˈkjuːz/ us LAW

to say that someone has done something wrong or illegal:

accuse sb of (doing) sth He is accused of misleading investors and lenders about the financial health of the company.

(Definition of “accuse” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)