Meaning of “ache” in the English Dictionary

"ache" in British English

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achenoun [ C ]

uk /eɪk/ us /eɪk/

B1 a continuous pain that is unpleasant but not very strong:

As you get older, you have all sorts of aches and pains.
I've got a dull (= slight) ache in my lower back.

B1 used in combinations with parts of the body to mean a continuous pain in the stated part:

I've had a stomach ache all morning.

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acheverb [ I ]

uk /eɪk/ us /eɪk/

B2 to have a continuous pain that is unpleasant but not very strong:

My head/tooth/back aches.
I ache/I'm aching all over.
I've got one or two aching muscles after yesterday's run.

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Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “ache” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ache" in American English

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achenoun [ C ]

us /eɪk/

a continuous pain that is unpleasant but not usually strong:

She has a fever, muscle aches, and a cough.

Ache is often used in combination:

acheverb

us /eɪk/

to have a continuous pain that is unpleasant but not usually strong:

[ I ] They did pushups until their arms ached.
[ I ] fig. Her heart ached (= She felt very sorry) for the people who had lost their loved ones in the plane crash.

(Definition of “ache” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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