after Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “after” in the English Dictionary

"after" in British English

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afterpreposition

uk   /ˈɑːf.tər/  us   /ˈæf.tɚ/
A1 following in ​time, ​place, or ​order: Let's go for a ​walk after ​breakfast. Some ​peoplebelieve in life after death. Her ​name came after mine on the ​list. There's a good ​film on the ​day after ​tomorrow. She ​waited until well after ​midnight.US It's a ​quarter after four. She just ​keeps on ​working, day after day, week after week (= ​continuously). We've had ​meeting after ​meeting (= many ​meetings) to ​discuss this ​point. Jessie ​seemed very ​small after (= in ​comparison with) Michael's ​children. After (= ​despite) everything I've done for you, is this the way you ​treat me? After (= because of) what she did to me, I'll never ​trust her again. The ​children have to ​learn to ​tidy up after themselves (= after they have made things ​untidy). She ​slammed the ​door after (= behind) her. We ​ran after (= ​followed) him, but he ​escaped. Could you ​lock up after you (= when you ​leave), ​please?be after sb/sth informal to be ​looking for someone or something or ​trying to ​find or get him, her, or it: The ​police are after him. I'm after a ​tie to go with this ​shirt. I'm ​sure she's after my ​husband. He's after Jane's ​job (= ​wants it for himself).after you used to say ​politely that someone can go in ​front of you or ​serve themselves with ​food before you: "Can I ​pour you some ​coffee?" "Oh no, after you." typical of or ​similar to the ​style of: a ​painting after ​Titian a ​concerto after MozartC2 used when giving someone or something the same ​name as another ​person or thing: He was ​namedMark after his ​grandfather.
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Idioms

afteradverb

uk   /ˈɑːf.tər/  us   /ˈæf.tɚ/
A2 later than someone or something ​else: Hilary got here at ​midday and Nick ​arrived soon after. I can't go next ​week - how about the ​week after (= the ​followingweek)?not standard She got back at 4.30 and went to ​see Emilie after (= after she got back).
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afterconjunction

uk   /ˈɑːf.tər/  us   /ˈæf.tɚ/
B1 at a ​time that is ​later than another ​event: Three ​months after they ​moved out, the ​house was still ​empty. Soon/​shortly after we set off, the ​carstarted to make a ​strangenoise. I went to the ​postoffice straight/​immediately after I ​left you.
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after-prefix

uk   /ɑːf.tə-/  us   /æf.tɚ-/
coming after: an after-dinner ​speech an after-hours ​club after-sales ​service
(Definition of after from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"after" in American English

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afterpreposition

 us   /ˈæf·tər/

after preposition (FOLLOWING)

following in ​time, ​place, or ​order: What do you ​want to do after ​breakfast? I ​expect to ​return to ​work after the ​baby comes. Repeat these words after me. I’ll ​see you the ​day after ​tomorrow. It’s ten ​minutes after four. Week after ​week (= For many ​weeks), he’s been too ​busy to ​help.

after preposition (BECAUSE)

as a ​result of; because: After what she did to me, I’ll never ​trust her again. She’s named after her ​aunt (= given the same ​name in her ​honor).

after preposition (DESPITE)

despite: Even after everything that’s ​happened here, his ​behaviorseemsodd.

after preposition (WANTING)

wanting to ​find or have: The ​police are after him. He’s after Jane’s ​job.
after
conjunction  us   /ˈæf·tər/
The ​house was ​empty for three ​months after they moved out.
after
adverb [not gradable]  us   /ˈæf·tər/
Hilary ​drove up and Nick ​arrivedsoon after.
Idioms
(Definition of after from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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