aggressive Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “aggressive” in the English Dictionary

"aggressive" in British English

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aggressiveadjective

uk   us   /əˈɡres.ɪv/

aggressive adjective (ANGRY)

B2 behaving in an ​angry and ​violent way towards another ​person: Men ​tend to be more aggressive than women. If I ​criticize him, he gets aggressive and ​startsshouting.
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aggressive adjective (DETERMINED)

C1 determined to ​win or ​succeed and using ​forcefulaction to ​win or to ​achievesuccess: an aggressive ​electioncampaign aggressive ​marketingtactics Both ​playerswontheir first-round ​matches in aggressive ​style.
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aggressive adjective (DISEASE)

specialized medical An aggressive ​disease is one that ​spreadsquickly and has little ​chance of being ​cured: The more aggressive the ​cancer, the ​further and ​faster it ​spreads.

aggressive adjective (TREATMENT)

specialized medical used to ​describe a very ​strongtreatment for a ​seriouscondition: Brain ​cancerrequires aggressive ​treatment such as ​surgery.
aggressively
adverb uk   us   /-li/
B2 Small ​children often ​behave aggressively. The ​company is aggressively ​pursuing new ​businessopportunities. They ​played more aggressively in the second ​half.
(Definition of aggressive from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"aggressive" in American English

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aggressiveadjective

 us   /əˈɡres·ɪv/
using ​strong, ​forcefulmethods esp. to ​sell or ​persuade: The ​companymounted an aggressive ​marketingcampaign. You have to be aggressive if you ​want to ​succeed in this ​business.
aggressively
adverb  us   /əˈɡres·ɪv·li/
The ​company is aggressively ​pursuing new ​businessopportunities.
(Definition of aggressive from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"aggressive" in Business English

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aggressiveadjective

uk   us   /əˈɡresɪv/
done in a very forceful and ​competitive way in ​order to ​gain an ​advantage: aggressive marketing/expansion/recruiting Through aggressive ​marketing in ​Europe and Asia, the ​companypulled in an ​extra $4.5 ​billion and ​doubled its ​shareprices.aggressive campaigns/strategies/tactics Britain’s second largest water ​company is ​planning an aggressive ​campaign to ​winindustrial and ​businesscustomers from ​rivals.
forceful, ​competitive, and ​determined to ​win or get what you want: Many ​banks have become more aggressive in making ​loans to ​boostrevenuegrowth. The ​company has been ​losingmarketshare for five ​years, primarily to aggressive ​competitors that have ​undercut the ​company on ​price.
FINANCE used to describe ​investments that involve some ​risk or ​investors that take ​risks in ​order to ​gain the best ​results: aggressive funds/investments/trades He ​moved his ​money into more aggressive ​investments, ​includinghedgefunds and ​publiclytradedstocks. aggressive ​buyers/​sellers
aggressively
adverb /əˈɡresɪvli/
(Definition of aggressive from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “aggressive”
in Korean 공격적인…
in Arabic عُدْواني…
in Malaysian agresif…
in French agressif…
in Russian агрессивный, напористый…
in Chinese (Traditional) 好鬥的, 富於攻擊性的, 挑釁的…
in Italian aggressivo…
in Turkish saldırgan, kavgacı, başarılı olmak için güç kullanan…
in Polish agresywny…
in Spanish agresivo…
in Vietnamese hung hăng…
in Portuguese agressivo…
in Thai ก้าวร้าว…
in German aggressiv…
in Catalan agressiu…
in Japanese 人にくってかかる…
in Chinese (Simplified) 好斗的, 富于攻击性的, 挑衅的…
in Indonesian suka menyerang…
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“aggressive” in Business English

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