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Meaning of “aim” in the English Dictionary

"aim" in British English

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aimnoun

uk   /eɪm/ us   /eɪm/
  • aim noun (INTENTION)

B1 [C] a result that your plans or actions are intended to achieve: My main aim in life is to be a good husband and father. Our short-term aim is to deal with our current financial difficulties, but our long-term aim is to improve the company's profitability. The leaflet has been produced with the aim of increasing public awareness of the disease.

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  • aim noun (POINTING)

[U] the act of pointing a weapon towards something: He fired six shots at the target, but his aim was terrible, and he missed all of them. She raised her gun, took aim and fired.

aimverb

uk   /eɪm/ us   /eɪm/
  • aim verb (POINT)

[I or T] to point or direct a weapon towards someone or something that you want to hit: Aim (the arrow) a little above the target. Aim at the yellow circle. There are hundreds of nuclear missiles aimed at the main cities. She aimed (= directed) a kick at my shins. Let's aim for (= go in the direction of) Coventry first, and then we'll have a look at the map.

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(Definition of aim from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"aim" in American English

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aimverb

us   /eɪm/
  • aim verb (POINT)

[I/T] to point or direct a weapon or other object toward someone or something: [T] I turned and saw a big man aiming a camera at me.
[I/T] To aim something is also to direct it toward someone whom you want to influence or toward achieving something: [T] These ads are aimed at young people.
  • aim verb (INTEND)

[I] to plan for a specific purpose; intend: The measures aimed at preserving family life. This book aims at attracting the serious reader.

aimnoun

us   /eɪm/
  • aim noun (INTENTION)

[C] a result that your plans or actions are intended to achieve: The commission’s aim was to convince workers of their extreme importance in ship production.
  • aim noun (POINTING)

[U] the act of pointing a weapon toward something: She raised her bow, took aim, and hit the bull’s-eye.
(Definition of aim from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"AIM" in Business English

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AIMnoun

uk   us   STOCK MARKET
abbreviation for Alternative Investment Market: a stock market for small companies that is part of the London Stock Exchange: Originally an AIM share, SFI now has a full listing on the main stock market.

aimnoun [C]

uk   /eɪm/ us  
something that you plan or hope to achieve: Our aim is customer satisfaction.with the aim of doing sth Environmentalists designed the project with the aim of increasing awareness of industrial pollution.
See also

aimverb

uk   /eɪm/ us  
[I] to plan or hope to achieve something: aim to do sth A spokesman for the company says they are aiming to increase sales by 25% next year.aim for sth The former Senator now aims for a political appointment in Washington.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of AIM from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“aim” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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