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Meaning of “already” in the English Dictionary

"already" in British English

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alreadyadverb

uk   /ɔːlˈred.i/  us   /ɑːlˈred.i/
A2 before the present time: I asked him to come to the exhibition but he'd already seen it. The concert had already begun by the time we arrived. I've already told him. As I have already mentioned, I doubt that we will be able to raise all the money we need.
B1 earlier than the time expected: Are you buying Christmas cards already? It's only September! I've only eaten one course and I'm already full.

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(Definition of already from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"already" in American English

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alreadyadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ɔlˈred·i/
earlier than the time expected, in a short time, or before the present time: Are you planning a summer trip already? It’s only September! I’ve already seen that movie.
Already can also mean now: It’s bad enough already – don’t make it any worse.
(Definition of already from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “already”
in Korean 이미, 벌써…
in Arabic مِن قَبل, سَلفاً…
in Malaysian sudah, sebelum waktunya…
in French déjà…
in Russian уже…
in Chinese (Traditional) 已經,早已, 比預期早…
in Italian già…
in Turkish zaten, çok önceden, çoktan…
in Polish już…
in Spanish ya…
in Vietnamese đã…rồi, rồi à……
in Portuguese já…
in Thai ที่เกิดแล้วก่อนหน้านี้, แล้ว…
in German schon…
in Catalan ja…
in Japanese 以前に, これまでに, すでに…
in Chinese (Simplified) 已经,早已, 比预期早…
in Indonesian sudah…
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