Meaning of “although” in the English Dictionary

"although" in English

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althoughconjunction

uk /ɔːlˈðəʊ/ us /ɑːlˈðoʊ/

B1 despite the fact that:

She walked home by herself, although she knew that it was dangerous.
He decided to go, although I begged him not to.

B1 but:

He's rather shy, although he's not as bad as he used to be.
She'll be coming tonight, although I don't know exactly when.

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Grammar

(Definition of “although” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"although" in American English

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althoughconjunction

us /ɔlˈðoʊ/

despite the fact that, or despite being:

He decided to go, although I begged him not to.

(Definition of “although” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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although

All in all we are happy that we have done it although we are not yet totally happy with the quality of it.
I welcome the appreciable increase in allocations, especially for rural development, although that increase is mainly directed at the candidate countries.
Although these are only simple recitals, they fall outside the scope of the directive and we do not feel able to accept them.
There have been problems, but given the difficult circumstances, the demobilisation process can be qualified as successful, although reintegration has not yet been fully achieved.
Although some people might not like it, the election by direct universal suffrage of a constituent assembly is, in any democracy worthy of the name, a sacred rule.
We are not only talking about obsolete stocks of pesticides here, however, although it is important to tackle that problem very meticulously.
Although buildings, in particular, do, in fact, form part of the cultural heritage, they are in a bad state of repair in many areas.
Although we understand the importance of these substances in controlling pests, the fact is that alternatives do exist, particularly in organic farming.
Although it proposes a range of non-binding measures, the stress on the role of local communities, especially police, social workers, local authority healthcare staff and others is the right emphasis.
We state repeatedly in the reports that we need more public investment - although we do not say where we are to find the money - and more private investment.