Meaning of “anticipate” in the English Dictionary

"anticipate" in English

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anticipateverb [ T ]

uk /ænˈtɪs.ɪ.peɪt/ us /ænˈtɪs.ə.peɪt/

anticipate verb [ T ] (EXPECT)

C1 to imagine or expect that something will happen:

We don't anticipate any trouble.
We had one or two difficulties along the way that we didn't anticipate.
Are you anticipating a lot of people at the party tonight?
[ + -ing verb ] They anticipate having several applicants for the job.
[ + that ] They anticipate that they will have several applicants for the job
[ + question word ] At this stage we can't really anticipate what will happen.
The anticipated inflation figure is lower than last month's.

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(Definition of “anticipate” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"anticipate" in American English

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anticipateverb [ T ]

us /ænˈtɪs·əˌpeɪt/

to imagine or expect that something will happen, sometimes taking action in preparation for it:

No job cuts are anticipated under the new ownership.
[ + (that) clause ] I don’t anticipate (that) we’ll solve all our problems with one meeting.
We anticipate criticism but plan to go ahead anyway.
[ + question word ] At this stage we can’t anticipate what will happen.

(Definition of “anticipate” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"anticipate" in Business English

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anticipateverb [ T ]

uk /ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt/ us

to imagine or expect that something will happen:

anticipate problems/difficulties It's always best to anticipate problems before they arise.
The anticipated inflation figure is lower than last month's.
anticipate that They anticipate that their lawyers will appeal the decision, though that process could take at least nine months.

(Definition of “anticipate” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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anticipate

In this respect, the responsibility rests solely with the companies – they must produce and they must help their employees to anticipate by providing them with continuing training.
I also agree that it is appropriate that a recovery plan should anticipate a recovery taking place within less than five years.
To maintain competitiveness in the sector we shall need to anticipate future developments as early as possible and apply them to training systems immediately.
The report itself is sound because it conveys the key messages without going so far as to anticipate the work of the fundamental rights convention.
I anticipate the aid increasing all the time, and it would grow at a rate in excess of the general rate of inflation.
Allow me to anticipate these and state that politicians ought to listen to scientific assessments and conclusions and not try to make their own assessments of the scientific research material.
I am also envisaging that the authority will be much more proactive than our current regime - anticipate rather than react, identify issues before they become crises.
They anticipate its dissolution and aim to establish their own power, ushering in new institutions and symbols corresponding to their own needs and values.
Unfortunately, the wish to anticipate any eventualities and to produce a regulation that is as complete and comprehensive as possible seems to have prevailed.
We need to know the costs of training, but also the costs of failing to train or failing to anticipate the changes that our workers and industries need to make.

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