arbitrate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “arbitrate” in the English Dictionary

"arbitrate" in British English

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arbitrateverb [I or T]

uk   /ˈɑː.bɪ.treɪt/  us   /ˈɑːr.bə.treɪt/
(Definition of arbitrate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"arbitrate" in American English

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arbitrateverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈɑr·bɪˌtreɪt/
to make a formal judgment to decide an argument: [T] A referee was hired to arbitrate the dispute.
arbitrator
noun [C]  us   /ˈɑr·bɪˌtreɪ·t̬ər/ (also arbiter)
The independent arbitrator has the approval of both sides in the dispute.
(Definition of arbitrate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"arbitrate" in Business English

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arbitrateverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈɑːbɪtreɪt/ LAW
to make an official decision that ends a legal disagreement between people or groups without the need for the disagreement to be solved in court: "We believe that a judge will ultimately say this should be arbitrated, not litigated, and we would comply with that," he said. A LIFFE official is responsible for ensuring an orderly pit and for arbitrating in the case of disputed trades.
to agree to allow a qualified person to find an acceptable solution to a disagreement without the need for the disagreement to be solved in court: Investors generally must agree when they open an account to arbitrate any dispute rather than go to court.
(Definition of arbitrate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“arbitrate” in American English

“arbitrate” in Business English

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