arm Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “arm” in the English Dictionary

"arm" in British English

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armnoun

uk   /ɑːm/  us   /ɑːrm/
  • arm noun (BODY PART)

A1 [C] either of the two long parts of the upper body that are attached to the shoulders and have the hands at the end: My arms ache from carrying this bag. She put/threw her arms round me and gave me a hug. He took/held her in his arms (= held her closely). Bill arrived at the party with his new girlfriend on his arm (= her hand resting on his arm).
C2 [C] The arm of a piece of clothing or furniture is a part of it that you put your arm in or on: the arm of a jacket the arm of a chair
arm in arm
C2 When two people are arm in arm, they both have one arm bent at the elbow and passing around and supporting, or being supported by, the arm of the other person: We walked arm in arm along the river bank.

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  • arm noun (WEAPONS)

arms [plural]
weapons and equipment used to kill and injure people: They have been charged with supplying arms to the guerrillas. An arms cache was discovered in South Wales. The minister has called on the terrorists to lay down their arms (= stop fighting). They are willing to take up arms (= prepare to fight) (against the government) if they have to.
  • arm noun (OF LAND/WATER)

[C] An arm of land or water is a long, thin part of it that is joined to a larger area.
  • arm noun (OF ORGANIZATION)

[C] An arm of an organization is a part of it that is responsible for a particular activity or place: The British company is one arm of a large multinational.

armverb

uk   /ɑːm/  us   /ɑːrm/
[I or T] to provide yourself or others with a weapon or weapons: Nobody knows who is arming the terrorists. I armed myself with a baseball bat and went to investigate the noise. They are currently arming for war.
Opposite
C2 [T] to provide yourself or others with equipment or knowledge in order to complete a particular task: She armed herself for the interview by finding out all she could about the company in advance. I went to the meeting armed with the relevant facts and figures.

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(Definition of arm from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"arm" in American English

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armnoun [C]

 us   /ɑrm/
  • arm noun [C] (BODY PART)

either of the two long parts of the upper body that are joined to the shoulders and have hands at the end: Her arm was bandaged from elbow to wrist. He held his young son in his arms (= closely).
The arm of a piece of clothing or furniture is a part of it that you put your arm in or on: the arm of a jacket/chair
An arm of an organization is a part of it with particular responsibilities: the company's investment banking arm

armverb [T]

 us   /ɑrm/
  • arm verb [T] (PROVIDE WEAPONS)

to provide yourself or others with a weapon or weapons: He armed himself with a baseball bat before going outside.
(Definition of arm from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"ARM" in Business English

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ARMnoun [C]

uk   us   (also variable rate mortgage) US FINANCE, PROPERTY
adjustable rate mortgage: a loan for buying a house in which the interest rate can change: ARM loans

armnoun [C]

uk   us   /ɑːm/
a part of a large company or organization that is responsible for a particular activity or place: A loss on the sale of its outdoor advertising arm pre-tax profits. The German arm accounted for about 40% of materials handling. The new constitution has strengthened the legislative arm of government.
(Definition of ARM from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“arm” in American English

“arm” in Business English

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