Meaning of “attrition” in the English Dictionary

american-english dictionary
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"attrition" in British English

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attritionnoun [ U ]

uk /əˈtrɪʃ.ən/ us /əˈtrɪʃ.ən/

formal gradually making something weaker and destroying it, especially the strength or confidence of an enemy by repeatedly attacking it:

Terrorist groups and the government have been engaged in a costly war of attrition since 2008.

US UK natural wastage business a reduction in the number of people who work for an organization that is achieved by not replacing those people who leave

US UK wastage the people who leave an educational or training course before it has finished:

The high attrition rates on the degree programs are a cause for concern.

(Definition of “attrition” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"attrition" in American English

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attritionnoun [ U ]

us /əˈtrɪʃ·ən/ fml

a gradual reduction in the number of people who work for an organization that is achieved by not replacing those who leave:

Most of the job losses will come through attrition.

(Definition of “attrition” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"attrition" in Business English

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attritionnoun [ U ]

uk /əˈtrɪʃən/ us

HR a reduction in the number of employees in a company made by not replacing those who leave, rather than forcing people to leave their jobs:

The majority of jobs will go through natural attrition.
Staff attrition rates are high.

MARKETING a reduction in the number of people who buy a product or service, for example because of its age, increased competition, etc.:

We aim to minimize the rate of customer attrition.

(Definition of “attrition” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)