begin Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “begin” in the English Dictionary

"begin" in British English

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beginverb [I or T]

uk   us   /bɪˈɡɪn/ (present participle beginning, past tense began, past participle begun)

begin verb [I or T] (START TO HAPPEN)

A1 to ​start to ​happen or ​exist: What ​time does the ​concert begin? The ​bridge was begun five ​years ago and the ​estimatedcost has already ​doubled. The ​film they ​want to ​watch begins at seven. The ​meeting began promisingly, but then things ​started to go ​wrong.
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begin verb [I or T] (START TO DO)

A2 to ​start to do something: I began the ​book six ​months ago, but I can't ​seem to ​finish it. [+ -ing verb] Jane has just begun ​learning to ​drive. If you ​want to ​learn to ​play a ​musicalinstrument, it might be a good ​idea to begin on something ​simple. [+ to infinitive] After ​waiting for ​half an ​hour she was beginning to get ​angry. I have so much to ​tell you, I don't ​know where to begin.
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begin verb [I or T] (START SPEAKING)

to ​startspeaking: [+ speech] "Well," he began. "I don't ​quiteknow how to ​tell you this."

begin verb [I or T] (FIRST PART)

to have something as the first ​part: The word "​cat" begins with the ​letter "c".
(Definition of begin from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"begin" in American English

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beginverb [I/T]

 us   /bɪˈɡɪn/ (present participle beginning, past tense began  /bɪˈɡæn/ , past participle begun  /bɪˈɡʌn/ )
to do or be the first ​part of something that ​continues; ​start: [T] He begins his new ​job on ​Monday. [I] The ​movie begins at seven. [I] I began by ​explaining why I had come.
(Definition of begin from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“begin” in American English

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