belt Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “belt” in the English Dictionary

"belt" in British English

See all translations


uk   us   /belt/

belt noun (CLOTHING)

A2 [C] a ​strip of ​leather or ​materialworn around the ​waist to ​supportclothes or for ​decoration: She fastened her belt ​tightly around her ​waist. He had ​eaten so much that he had to loosen his belt a ​couple of ​notches.
More examples

belt noun (MOVING STRIP)

[C] a ​flatstrip of ​material in a ​machine that ​moves along ​continuously to ​keep another ​partturning, or to ​keepobjects on it ​moving along: a ​fan belt a ​conveyor belt

belt noun (AREA)

[C usually singular] an ​area, usually just ​outside a ​city, where a ​particulargroup of ​peoplelive, such as the commuter belt and the stockbroker belt, or an ​area that is ​known for a ​particularcharacteristic, such as the ​cotton belt (= an ​area where ​cotton is ​grown)

belt noun (HIT)

[C usually singular] informal a hard ​hit or punch: a belt on the ​jaw


uk   us   /belt/

belt verb (MOVE FAST)

[I + adv/prep] UK informal (​especially of a ​vehicle) to ​travel with ​greatspeed: The ​car was belting along/down the ​road.

belt verb (HIT)

[T] informal to ​hit someone or something hard, ​especially with ​violence: He belted him in the ​face.

belt verb (CLOTHING)

[T] to ​tie something with a belt: I belted my ​coattightly.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of belt from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"belt" in American English

See all translations

beltnoun [C]

 us   /belt/

belt noun [C] (STRIP)

a ​strip of ​leather or other ​materialworn around the ​waist: a ​blackleather belt A belt is also a ​continuousstrip of ​material that moves as ​part of a ​machine.

belt noun [C] (AREA)

an ​area that is ​known for a ​particularcharacteristic: the ​corn belt (= ​areaknown for ​growingcorn) earth science A belt is also a ​region that has a ​particulartype of climate .

beltverb [T]

 us   /belt/ infml

belt verb [T] (HIT)

to ​hit someone or something hard: He belted the ​ball out of the ​park for a ​homerun.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of belt from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of belt?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“belt” in American English

Word of the Day


to get knowledge or skill in a new subject or activity

Word of the Day

Tree huggers and climate change deniers
Tree huggers and climate change deniers
by Colin McIntosh,
October 08, 2015
The climate debate is one that has predictably generated a large amount of new vocabulary, some of it originally specialized scientific terminology that has been taken up by the media and is now common currency. Some of these terms are new additions to the Cambridge English Dictionary. The two opposing sides in

Read More 

face training noun
face training noun
October 05, 2015
a system of facial exercises designed to tone the facial muscles and improve the skin

Read More