Meaning of “beyond” in the English Dictionary

"beyond" in English

See all translations

beyondpreposition, adverb

uk /biˈjɒnd/ us /biˈjɑːnd/

beyond preposition, adverb (FURTHER AWAY)

B1 further away in the distance (than something):

In the distance, beyond the river, was a small town.
From the top of the hill we could see our house and the woods beyond.

More examples

beyond preposition, adverb (OUTSIDE A LIMIT)

B1 outside or after (a stated limit):

Few people live beyond the age of a hundred.
We cannot allow the work to continue beyond the end of the year.
I've got nothing to tell you beyond (= in addition to) what I told you earlier.
The repercussions will be felt throughout the industry and beyond (= in other areas).
Tonight's performance has been cancelled due to circumstances beyond our control (= events that we are unable to deal with).
She has always lived beyond her means (= spent more than she has earned).
go beyond sth

to be more than or not limited to something:

The appeal of this device goes beyond convenience.
beyond belief, repair, recognition, etc.

C2 too great or bad for anyone to believe, repair, recognize, etc.:

His thoughtlessness is beyond belief.
He survived the accident, but his car was damaged beyond repair.
beyond excited, serious, angry, etc.

informal extremely excited, serious, angry, etc.:

She says she is beyond excited to see her son for the first time in more than three years.
These days, I'm beyond happy.
beyond reasonable doubt UK US beyond a reasonable doubt

If a legal case or a person's guilt is proved beyond reasonable doubt, there is enough proof for the person accused of a crime to be judged guilty:

More examples

beyond preposition, adverb (NOT UNDERSTAND)

be beyond sb

C1 informal If something is beyond you, you are unable to understand it:

Physics is completely beyond me.

(Definition of “beyond” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"beyond" in American English

See all translations

beyondpreposition, adverb [ not gradable ]

us /biˈɑnd/

beyond preposition, adverb [ not gradable ] (FARTHER AWAY)

farther away in the distance than something:

Beyond the river was a small town.
From the top of the hill we could see our house and the woods beyond.

beyond preposition, adverb [ not gradable ] (OUTSIDE A LIMIT)

outside or after a stated limit:

Few people live beyond the age of a hundred.
Beyond a certain level of tiredness, it is impossible to work productively.
Tonight’s performance has been cancelled due to circumstances beyond our control.

Beyond also means more than:

I’ve got nothing to tell you beyond what I said earlier.
My job goes beyond teaching facts – my aim is to get children to think for themselves.

Beyond also means at a point where something could not be:

She has changed beyond recognition.
The car was damaged beyond repair.

(Definition of “beyond” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Help us add to the Cambridge Dictionary!

These examples are from external sources. Click on the icon to tell us if any are not OK.

beyond

The end result should put beyond doubt the quality and safety of all food products, and provide the assurances consumers have been seeking and to which they are entitled.
We know about the disasters, we have spoken about them very often, starting with the situation of women, but unfortunately they go far beyond that.
Thirdly, should we not be a bit more cautious with the culling programme now, because this epidemic may force a culling programme which goes beyond what we had intended?
Well, in education we are endeavouring to prevent our cultural knowledge from travelling beyond the border and the result is clearly a broken and fragmented project.
However, beyond this reality, which is certainly used as a pretext, the final proposals in this report go far beyond what we were hoping for.
We cannot ignore the immense loss of human investment this first generation of victims represents, a loss which goes beyond the personal tragedy suffered by the sick and their families.
Do we want to remain a large market which functions well with a single currency or do we want to go beyond that?
As you can see in this budget, this is a political debate which goes beyond a strict examination of what you have done with regard to the 1998 budget.
From recent data, it became clear that these limits would impose requirements beyond the scope of what is reasonably achievable, without benefit to public health.
We need to rethink and recognise that water is our most important asset and that our responsibility towards it goes far beyond the present generation.