Meaning of “biased” in the English Dictionary

"biased" in British English

See all translations

biasedadjective

uk /ˈbaɪ.əst/ us /ˈbaɪ.əst/

C1 showing an unreasonable like or dislike for a person based on personal opinions:

The newspapers gave a very biased report of the meeting.
I think she's beautiful but then I'm biased since she's my daughter.
Opposite

More examples

  • A lot of people think that most newspapers are biased towards one particular political party.
  • Liverpool only lost the game because the referee was biased.
  • The president criticized the Western press for their biased views.
  • It's obvious that most of the committee are biased in favour of the Labour Party.
  • His account of the situation was very biased and you should check your facts before making a judgment.

(Definition of “biased” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"biased" in American English

See all translations

biasedadjective

us /ˈbɑɪ·əst/

(Definition of “biased” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"biased" in Business English

See all translations

biasedadjective

also biassed uk /ˈbaɪəst/ us

preferring or disliking someone or something more than someone or something else, in a way that means that they are treated unfairly:

biased against sb/sth He believes the American justice system is biased against blacks.
biased in favour of sb/sth They claimed that the settlement was biased in favour of corporate clients.

giving results that are not accurate because information has not been collected correctly:

A biased sample of interviewees has a set of characteristics that are different from those of the population as a whole.
Compare

(Definition of “biased” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)