birth Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “birth” in the English Dictionary

"birth" in British English

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uk   /bɜːθ/  us   /bɝːθ/
A2 [C or U] the ​time when a ​baby or ​younganimal comes out of ​its mother's ​body: It was a ​difficult birth. He ​weighed eight ​pounds at birth. More men are ​present at the births of ​theirchildren these ​days. The ​applicationform will ​ask for ​your country/​place of birth (= where you were ​born). [C] a ​child that is ​born: The ​percentage of live births (= ​children who are ​bornalive and ​continue to ​live)continues to ​increase. Registration of births and ​deathsbecamecompulsory in 1871. [U] the ​position of the ​family into which you are ​born, ​especiallyitssocialposition: He had ​received all the ​advantages of birth (= having been ​born into a ​family of a high ​socialclass) and an ​expensiveeducation.American, Italian, etc. by birth B2 born in a ​particularplace or having ​parents of a ​particularnationality: Oscar Wilde was ​Irish by birth.C1 the ​beginning of something: These ​asteroids were ​formed at the birth of the ​solarsystem.
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(Definition of birth from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"birth" in American English

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birthnoun [C/U]

 us   /bɜrθ/
the ​occasion when a ​baby comes out of ​its mother’s ​body: [C] He ​remembered the birth of ​their first ​child. [U] Their ​sonweighed eight ​pounds at birth. Birth also refers to ​yourfamilyorigin: [U] She was Swedish by birth. When a woman gives birth, one or more ​babies come out of her ​body: [U] She gave birth to ​twins.
(Definition of birth from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“birth” in British English

“birth” in American English

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