bitter Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “bitter” in the English Dictionary

"bitter" in British English

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bitteradjective

uk   /ˈbɪt.ər/ us   /ˈbɪt̬.ɚ/
  • bitter adjective (ANGRY)

B2 Someone who is bitter is angry and unhappy because they cannot forget bad things that happened in the past: I feel very bitter about my childhood and all that I went through. She'd suffered terribly over the years but it hadn't made her bitter.
B2 A bitter experience causes deep pain or anger: Failing the final exams was a bitter disappointment for me. She learned through bitter experience that he was not to be trusted.
B2 expressing a lot of hate and anger: a bitter fight/argument bitter recriminations He gave me a bitter look.

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  • bitter adjective (TASTE)

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bitternoun [U]

uk   /ˈbɪt.ər/ us   /ˈbɪt̬.ɚ/
UK a type of dark brown beer with a bitter taste: a pint of bitter
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bitters
a strong, bitter alcoholic drink made from spices and plant products that is mixed with other alcoholic drinks
(Definition of bitter from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bitter" in American English

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bitteradjective

us   /ˈbɪt̬·ər/
  • bitter adjective (TASTE)

having a slightly stinging, strong taste, not salty or sweet: The coffee was bitter.
  • bitter adjective (ANGRY)

showing or causing deep anger and pain: Losing the election was a bitter disappointment.
bitterness
noun [U] us   /ˈbɪt̬·ər·nəs/
She has no bitterness about the past.

bitteradjective, adverb

us   /ˈbɪt̬·ər/
  • bitter adjective, adverb (COLD)

extremely cold: A bitter wind kept everyone indoors.
(Definition of bitter from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bitter?
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