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Meaning of “boost” in the English Dictionary

"boost" in British English

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boostverb [T]

uk   /buːst/  us   /buːst/
B2 to ​improve or ​increase something: The ​theatremanaged to boost ​itsaudiences by ​cuttingticketprices. Share ​prices were boosted by ​reports of the president's ​recovery. I ​tried to boost his ego (= make him ​feel more ​confident) by ​praising his ​cooking.

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boostnoun [C usually singular]

uk   /buːst/  us   /buːst/
B2 the ​act of boosting something: The ​lowering of ​interestrates will give a much-needed boost to the ​economy. Passing my ​drivingtest was such a boost to my confidence.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of boost from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"boost" in American English

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boostverb

 us   /bust/
  • boost verb (MAKE BETTER)

[T] to ​improve or ​increase something: We took ​varioussteps to ​try to boost ​sales.
  • boost verb (LIFT)

[T always + adv/prep] to ​lift someone or something by ​pushing from below: She boosted the little ​boy up to ​see over the ​fence.

boostnoun

 /bust/
  • boost noun (IMPROVEMENT)

[C usually sing] an ​improvement or ​increase, or an ​action that ​causes this: The president’s ​approvalrating got a boost ​following his ​speech.
  • boost noun (LIFT)

[C] a ​push from below that ​lifts a ​person or thing: I need a boost to get over the ​wall.
(Definition of boost from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"boost" in Business English

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boostverb [T]

uk   us   /buːst/
to ​increase or ​improve something: boost profits/prices/rates The ​industry has ​exceeded all ​expectations for boosting ​profits and ​dividends.boost exports/sales/trade The ​lowerexchangerate is already boosting ​exports.boost confidence/morale He was ​elected on a ​platform to ​createjobs and boost ​investorconfidence. The ​effect of these ​policies would be to encourage ​spending and boost the ​economy. boost ​production/​performance/​productivityboost sth (by) 20%/50%/100%, etc. The ​company boosted its ​dividend nearly 50%.

boostnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /buːst/
an ​act or ​event that ​increases or ​improves something: Typically ​salesjump in the autumn, when they get a boost from the back-to-school and ​holidayshoppingseasons. The ​campaign for ​pensionreform received a boost on Friday. Shares on Wall Street were given a boost by a ​rally in the US Treasury ​bondmarket. a big/​major/huge/significant boost
an ​increase: a boost in sth Motorists who ​operate diesel-powered ​vehicles would face a 1.5-cent-a-gallon boost in ​fueltaxes. The ​income boost for the two million ​lowestpaid will not take ​effect until October.
(Definition of boost from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “boost”
in Korean 북돋다…
in Arabic يَزيد…
in Malaysian tambah…
in French gonfler, renforcer…
in Russian поддержка…
in Chinese (Traditional) 改善, 提高, 增強…
in Italian aumentare, incrementare…
in Turkish desteklemek, kendine güvenli ve mutlu olmasına yardımcı olmak…
in Polish zastrzyk…
in Spanish aumentar…
in Vietnamese làm tăng…
in Portuguese aumentar…
in Thai ส่งเสริม…
in German Auftrieb geben…
in Catalan incrementar, incentivar…
in Japanese ~を増やす, 促進する…
in Chinese (Simplified) 改善, 提高, 增强…
in Indonesian meningkatkan…
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“boost” in British English

“boost” in Business English

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