boot Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “boot” in the English Dictionary

"boot" in British English

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bootnoun

uk   us   /buːt/

boot noun (SHOE)

A1 [C] a ​type of ​shoe that ​covers the ​wholefoot and the ​lowerpart of the ​leg: walking boots riding boots
More examples

boot noun (CAR)

B1 [C] UK (US trunk) a ​coveredspace at the back of a ​car, for ​storing things in: I always ​keep a ​blanket and a ​toolkit in the boot for ​emergencies. Stolen ​goods were ​found in the boot of her ​car.

boot noun (END)

the boot [S] informal the ​situation in which ​yourjob is taken away from you, usually because you have done something ​wrong or ​badly: She got the boot for ​stealingmoney from the ​cashregister. Williams has been given the boot from the ​team.

boot noun (KICK)

[C] UK informal a ​kick with the ​foot: He gave the ​ball a good boot.

boot noun (WHEEL)

[C] US (also Denver boot, UK wheel clamp) a ​metaldeviceattached to the ​wheel of an ​illegallyparkedcar that will only be ​removed when the ​ownerpays an ​amount of ​money

bootverb

uk   us   /buːt/

boot verb (KICK)

[T usually + adv/prep] informal to ​kick someone or something hard with the ​foot: They booted him in the ​head.

boot verb (COMPUTER)

[I or T] (also boot up) When a ​computer boots (up), it ​becomesready for use by getting the ​necessaryinformation into ​itsmemory, and when you boot (up) a ​computer, you ​cause it to do this.
(Definition of boot from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"boot" in American English

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bootnoun [C]

 us   /but/

boot noun [C] (SHOE)

a ​type of ​shoe that ​covers the ​foot and the ​lowerleg: work boots cowboy boots

boot noun [C] (STORAGE SPACE)

Br trunk
Idioms

bootverb

 us   /but/

boot verb (MAKE READY)

[I/T] to ​cause a ​computer or a ​computerprogram to ​becomeready for use: [I] Before you can do anything, you have to boot up.

boot verb (KICK)

[T] to ​kick something: She booted the ​ball down the ​field.
(Definition of boot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"boot" in Business English

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bootverb [I or T]

uk   us   /buːt/ (also boot up)
IT when a ​computer boots or is booted, it ​loads its operatingsystem and ​startsworking: The PC should now boot from the ​CD-ROMdrive and the ​installation will begin. Boot up your ​computer and ​log onto your company's ​intranet.
(Definition of boot from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of boot?
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