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Meaning of “borrow” in the English Dictionary

"borrow" in British English

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borrowverb

uk   /ˈbɒr.əʊ/  us   /ˈbɑːr.oʊ/
  • borrow verb (RECEIVE)

A2 [T] to get or ​receive something from someone with the ​intention of giving it back after a ​period of ​time: I had to borrow a ​pen from the ​invigilator to do the ​exam.UK non-standard Can I borrow £100 off you until next ​week? She used to borrow ​money and not ​bother to ​pay it back. He borrowed a ​novel from the ​library.
C1 [I or T] to take ​money from a ​bank or other ​financialorganization and ​pay it back over a ​period of ​time: Like so many ​companies at that ​time, we had to borrow heavily to ​survive. We could always borrow some ​money from the ​bank.
[T] to take and use a word or ​idea from another ​language or ​piece of ​work: English has borrowed many words fromFrench.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • borrow verb (MATHEMATICS)

[T] to put a ​number into a different ​column when doing ​subtraction
borrower
noun [C] uk   /ˈbɒr.əʊ.ər/  us   /ˈbɑːr.oʊ.ɚ/
a ​person, ​organization, etc. that borrows: Banks are ​encouraging new borrowers.
borrowing
noun [C or U] uk   /ˈbɒr.əʊ.ɪŋ/  us   /ˈbɑːr.oʊ.ɪŋ/
Public borrowing has ​increased in ​recentyears.
(Definition of borrow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"borrow" in American English

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borrowverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈbɑr·oʊ, ˈbɔr-/
to take something from someone with the ​intention of giving it back after using it: [T] Could I borrow ​yourbike until next ​week? [T] fig. We ​constantly borrow words from other ​cultures.
borrower
noun [C]  us   /ˈbɑr·ə·wər, ˈbɔr-/
The ​ratecharged to borrowers is 9.7%.
borrowing
noun [C/U]  us   /ˈbɑr·ə·wɪŋ, ˈbɔr-/
[U] Jefferson ​opposedgovernment borrowing.
(Definition of borrow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"borrow" in Business English

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borrowverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈbɒrəʊ/
FINANCE, BANKING to take ​money from a ​bank or other ​financialorganization with the intention of ​paying it back over a ​period of ​time, usually with ​interestadded on: He will have to borrow £300 million to make his controversial ​takeoverbidsuccessful. Find out how much you can ​afford to borrow before you decide to ​buy a ​house.borrow from sth If you borrow from a ​creditcard, the ​interest can be 20%.borrow sth from sth This is a way of borrowing ​money from ​internationalfinancialmarkets. Countries who had borrowed ​heavily to ​pay for ​oilimports were ​hit hard.
to ​ask someone to give you ​money for a ​period of ​time, after which you intend to give it back to them: Can I borrow £20? I'll ​pay you back tomorrow.borrow (sth) from sb He borrowed some ​money from a friend.
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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of borrow from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“borrow” in American English

“borrow” in Business English

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