bound Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “bound” in the English Dictionary

"bound" in British English

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boundadjective

uk   us   /baʊnd/
  • bound adjective (CERTAIN)

B2 [after verb] certain or ​extremelylikely to ​happen: [+ to infinitive] You're bound toforget people's ​namesoccasionally. You're bound tofeelnervous about ​yourinterview. These two ​youngmusicians are bound forinternationalsuccess (= are ​certain to be ​successful).be bound and determined US to be ​seriouslyintending to do something: They are bound and ​determined to ​buildtheir own ​housesomeday.I'll be bound UK old-fashioned I am ​certain: He's in the ​pub, I'll be bound.
  • bound adjective (FASTENED)

tied with ​rope, cord, ​string, etc.: We ​found the ​girl bound and ​gagged. (of a ​book) having a ​cover made of ​paper, ​leather, or other ​material: The ​book was bound in ​shinygreenleather.
  • bound adjective (DIRECTION)

C1 [after verb] going to: She was on a ​plane bound for Moscow when she got ​sick.

boundverb

uk   us   /baʊnd/

boundnoun

uk   us   /baʊnd/
  • bound noun (JUMP)

[C] a ​quick, ​longjump: With one bound the ​dog was over the ​fence.

-boundsuffix

uk   us   /-baʊnd/
  • -bound suffix (DIRECTION)

travelling in the ​stateddirection: Northbound ​traffic is ​moving very ​slowly because of the ​accident.US The ​line did not ​closecompletely, but ​inbound and ​outboundtrains (= ​trains which were ​arriving and ​leaving) had to ​share one of the two ​tracks near the ​station.
  • -bound suffix (COVERED)

used to ​describe a ​book that is ​covered or ​held together in the ​stated way: a leather-bound ​book a ​spiral-boundnotebook used to ​describeclothes or other ​objects that have ​edgescovered in the ​stated way: leather-bound ​cuffs
(Definition of bound from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bound" in American English

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bound

 us   /bɑʊnd/
  • bound (TIE)

past simple and past participle ofbind

boundadjective

 us   /bɑʊnd/
  • bound adjective (CERTAIN)

[not gradable] certain or ​extremelylikely to ​happen: [+ to infinitive] You’re bound to ​feelnervous about ​yourinterview.
  • bound adjective (TIED)

[not gradable] tiedtightly or ​fastened: Several of the ​prisoners had been bound.
  • bound adjective (FORCED)

having a ​moral or ​legal duty to do something: She is not ​legally bound to ​pay the ​debts, but she has ​agreed to do it ​anyway.
  • bound adjective (TOWARD)

[not gradable] traveling in the ​direction of: She was on a ​plane bound for Fairbanks. fig. These two ​youngmusicians are bound for ​success.

boundverb

 us   /bɑʊnd/
  • bound verb (LIMIT)

[T] to ​mark or ​form the ​limits of: The ​town is bounded on one ​side by a ​river.
  • bound verb (JUMP)

[I always + adv/prep] to move ​quickly with ​large, ​jumpingmovements: A ​deer bounded ​across the ​road.

boundnoun [C]

 /bɑʊnd/
  • bound noun [C] (JUMP)

a ​quick, ​largejump: With one bound the ​dog was over the ​fence.
(Definition of bound from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"bound" in Business English

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boundadjective

uk   us   /baʊnd/
[after noun] LAW having a ​legalduty to do something: be bound to do sth Because of ​internationaltreatyobligations, the Government is legally bound to consider every asylum ​claim.be bound by sth Many ​governmentagencies are bound by a ​federalorder to adequately ​serve speakers of other ​languages or ​risklosingfunding.
[before noun] COMMERCE kept at or below an ​agreed or ​allowedlevel: a bound level/rate/tariff Overall, the ​percentage of ​developed countries' ​imports of ​industrialgoods under bound ​ratesrose from 94% to 99%.
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(Definition of bound from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bound” in Business English

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