box Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “box” in the English Dictionary

"box" in British English

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boxnoun

uk   /bɒks/  us   /bɑːks/
  • box noun (CONTAINER)

A1 [C] a square or rectangular container with stiff sides and sometimes a lid: a cardboard box a cigar box a matchbox
A1 [C] a box and its contents, or just the contents of a box: a box of matches He ate a whole box of chocolates.
[C] UK (US cup) a piece of hard plastic worn by men to protect their sex organs when playing a sport

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • box noun (SQUARE SPACE)

A2 [C] any square or rectangular space on a form, sports field, road, etc., separated from the main area by lines: If you would like more information, put an X in the box.
[C] US (UK box junction) a place where two roads cross, marked with a square of yellow lines painted in the centre, that you can drive over only when the road in front is clear
[C] a small space with walls: a jury/phone box Their new house is just a box (= very small).
[C] a small area with seats that is separate from the other seats in a theatre or at the side of a sports field: Can you see Prince Charles in the royal box?
  • box noun (TREE)

[U] a small evergreen tree (= one that never loses its leaves) with small, shiny leaves
See also

boxverb

uk   /bɒks/  us   /bɑːks/
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"box" in American English

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boxnoun [C]

 us   /bɑks/
  • box noun [C] (CONTAINER)

a container with stiff sides, shaped like a rectangle, or the contents of such a container: a cardboard/cereal box a box of chocolates (= the container and its contents)
A box is also a small space on a form marked by lines in the shape of a square: If you want to receive electronic updates, put a check in the box.
A box is sometimes a small enclosed place: the jury box

boxverb

 us   /bɑks/
  • box verb (PUT IN CONTAINER)

[T] to put something in a box: [M] Someone from the nursing home must have boxed up his clothes. [M] fig. My car was boxed in (= blocked) by two other cars, and I couldn’t get out.
  • box verb (FIGHT)

[I/T] to fight someone or be active in the sport of boxing: [I/T] I’d like to box him, and there’s a chance that we will box again in Germany.
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"box" in Business English

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boxnoun [C]

uk   us   /bɒks/
a square or rectangular container with stiff sides and sometimes a lid: Books are packed in cardboard boxes and are shipped direct to buyers' homes. a shipping/storage/packaging box
PRODUCTION a box and its contents, or just the contents of the box: Florida will produce 132 million boxes of oranges this season.
COMMUNICATIONS, INTERNET any square or rectangular space on a form or computer screen which is separated from the main area by lines: For tips on how to conduct your search, see the box on this page. For more information, tick the box on the coupon. In the box calling for a model number put 'unknown'.
COMMUNICATIONS →  box number
COMMUNICATIONS →  PO Box
→  set-top box
a small area with seats which is separate from the other seats in a theatre or at the side of a sports field: We will have a producer and a reporter in the press box feeding a play-by-play to the internet as the action unfolds. stadium box seats

boxverb [T]

uk   us   /bɒks/ (also box up)
PRODUCTION to put something in a box: About 3,000 workers busily boxed up millions of plastic toys.
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“box” in Business English

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