brace Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “brace” in the English Dictionary

"brace" in British English

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bracenoun

uk   /breɪs/ us   /breɪs/
  • brace noun (SUPPORT)

[C] plural braces something that is used to support or connect things, or to make something stronger: He was recently fitted with a brace for his bad back.
[C] UK US braces [plural] plural braces a set of connected wires that is attached to a person's teeth in order to make them straight: I had to wear a brace for my crooked teeth when I was a teenager.
braces [plural]
UK US suspenders a pair of narrow straps that stretch from the front of the trousers over your shoulders to the back to hold them up: a pair of braces
US UK calipers metal supports that are fastened to the legs of people who have difficulties with walking
  • brace noun (PAIR)

[C] plural brace two things of the same type, especially two wild birds that have been killed for sport or food: a brace of pheasants

braceverb [T]

uk   /breɪs/ us   /breɪs/
(Definition of brace from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"brace" in American English

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braceverb [T]

us   /breɪs/
  • brace verb [T] (PREPARE)

to prepare yourself physically or mentally for something unpleasant: The weather forecasters told us to brace ourselves for a heavy storm.
  • brace verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to support yourself or a part of your body: She braced herself against the dresser.
To brace an object is to support or strengthen it: You will need to brace the walls.

bracenoun [C]

us   /breɪs/
  • brace noun [C] (SUPPORT)

something that supports, fastens, or strengthens: He was recently fitted with a brace for his bad back.
(Definition of brace from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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