Meaning of “brave” in the English Dictionary

"brave" in British English

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braveadjective

uk /breɪv/ us /breɪv/

B1 showing no fear of dangerous or difficult things:

a brave soldier
It was a brave decision to quit her job and start her own business.
She was very brave to learn to ski at 50.
Of the three organizations criticized, only one was brave enough to face the press.
Richards has made a brave attempt to answer his critics.
This action will cause problems, despite the bank's brave talk/words about carrying on as if nothing had happened.

More examples

  • The four soldiers are to receive citations from the president for their brave actions.
  • Sailing the Atlantic in such a tiny boat wasn't so much brave as foolhardy.
  • Nelson Mandela is revered for his brave fight against apartheid.
  • It is a brave person who will die for their beliefs.
  • Let us make sure that these brave men did not die for nothing.
bravely
adverb uk /ˈbreɪv.li/ us /ˈbreɪv.li/

B1

She faced the consequences bravely.

braveverb [ T ]

uk /breɪv/ us /breɪv/

bravenoun [ C ]

uk /breɪv/ us /breɪv/ old-fashioned

(Definition of “brave” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"brave" in American English

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braveadjective [ -er/-est only ]

us /breɪv/

showing no fear of dangerous or difficult things:

She liked to read stories of brave pioneer women who had crossed the country in covered wagons.
Of the three organizations criticized, only one was brave enough to face the press.
bravely
adverb us /ˈbreɪv·li/

"The pain isn’t so bad," she said bravely.
bravery
noun [ U ] us /ˈbreɪ·və·ri, ˈbreɪv·ri/

They were awarded medals for bravery.

braveverb [ T ]

/breɪv/

to deal with dangerous or difficult things without fear:

He braved the anger/wrath of his father by quitting law school and becoming an artist.

(Definition of “brave” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)