bridge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “bridge” in the English Dictionary

"bridge" in British English

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bridgenoun

uk   us   /brɪdʒ/
  • bridge noun (LARGE STRUCTURE)

A2 [C] a ​structure that is ​built over a ​river, ​road, or ​railway to ​allowpeople and ​vehicles to ​cross from one ​side to the other: We ​drove across/over the bridge. the Brooklyn BridgeC2 [C usually singular] something that makes it ​easier to make a ​change from one ​situation to another: Part-time ​work can ​provide a bridge betweenstaying at ​home andworkingfull-time.

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  • bridge noun (PART OF A SHIP)

[C] the ​raisedpart of a ​ship on which the ​captain and other ​officersstand and from where they ​control the ​movement of the ​ship
  • bridge noun (NOSE)

[C usually singular] the ​toppart of the ​nose, between the ​eyes, or (on a ​pair of ​glasses) the ​piece that is ​supported by the ​toppart of the ​nose: The ​blowcaught him ​right on the bridge of his ​nose.
  • bridge noun (MUSICAL INSTRUMENT)

[C] a ​smallpiece of ​wood over which the ​strings are ​stretched on a ​musicalinstrument such as a ​guitar or violin

bridgeverb [T]

uk   us   /brɪdʒ/
(Definition of bridge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bridge" in American English

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bridgenoun

 us   /brɪdʒ/
  • bridge noun (LARGE STRUCTURE)

[C] a ​structure that is ​built over a ​river, ​road, or ​railroad to ​allowpeople and ​vehicles to cross from one ​side to the other: We ​droveacross the bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan.
  • bridge noun (NOSE)

[C usually sing] the ​toppart of the ​nose, between the ​eyes, or the ​piece on a ​pair of ​glasses that is ​supported by the ​toppart of the ​nose: He ​rubbed the bridge of his ​nose.
  • bridge noun (MUSICAL INSTRUMENT)

[C] a ​smallpiece of ​wood on a ​musicalinstrument, such as a ​guitar or ​violin, over which ​strings are ​stretched
  • bridge noun (TEETH)

[C] (also bridgework,  /ˈbrɪdʒˌwɜrk/ ) a ​piece of ​material that ​keepsartificialteeth in ​place by being ​fastened to the ​naturalteeth
  • bridge noun (PART OF A SHIP)

[C] the ​raisedpart of a ​ship on which the ​captain and other ​officersstand and from where they ​control the ​movement of the ​ship
  • bridge noun (GAME)

[U] a ​cardgame for four ​players who ​play in two ​pairs and ​try to ​win the ​cards they say they will ​win

bridgeverb [T]

 us   /brɪdʒ/
  • bridge verb [T] (BUILD OVER )

to ​build or ​form a bridge over something: The ​shoppingcomplex bridges a ​highway. If a ​difference is bridged, it is made ​smaller: Swing ​music bridged the ​gap between ​popular and ​classicalmusic.
(Definition of bridge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"bridge" in Business English

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bridgeadjective

uk   us   /brɪdʒ/ ( UK usually bridging)
FINANCE relating to ​money that is ​borrowed for a ​shortperiod of ​time, until ​money is ​available for a ​longerperiod: bridge fund/finance/financing A ​group of ​loyaldonorspledged a bridge ​fund of $20 million to the orchestra.
(Definition of bridge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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