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Meaning of “bring” in the English Dictionary

"bring" in British English

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bringverb [T]

uk   /brɪŋ/  us   /brɪŋ/ (brought, brought)
  • bring verb [T] (TOWARDS PLACE)

A2 to take or ​carry someone or something to a ​place or a ​person, or in the ​direction of the ​personspeaking: "Shall I bring anything to the ​party?" "Oh, just a ​bottle." [+ two objects] Bring me that ​knife/Bring that ​knife to me. Can you ​help me bring in the ​shopping (= take it into the ​house)? The ​police brought several men in for ​questioning (= took them to the ​policestation because they might have been ​involved in a ​crime). When they ​visit us they always bring ​theirdog with them.

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  • bring verb [T] (CAUSE)

B1 to ​cause, ​result in, or ​produce a ​state or ​condition: [+ two objects] She's brought us so much ​happiness over the ​years. [+ -ing verb] The ​explosion brought the ​wholebuildingcrashing to the ​ground. Several ​trees were brought down (= made to ​fall) by the ​storm. The ​closure of the ​factory brought ​poverty to the ​town (= ​resulted in it ​becomingpoor). Bring the ​water to the ​boil (= make it ​startboiling). She ​suddenly brought the ​interview to an end. Her ​tragicstory brought tears to myeyes (= made me ​cry). What will the ​future bring for these ​refugees?
bring sb to sth
to ​cause someone to come to a ​particularplace or thing: This ​subject brings me to the second ​part of the ​discussion. What brings you (= why have you come) to Miami?

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(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bring" in American English

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bringverb [T]

 us   /brɪŋ/ (past tense and past participle brought  /brɔt/ )
  • bring verb [T] (TAKE)

to take or ​carry someone or something to a ​place or a ​person, or in the ​direction of the ​personspeaking: Bring me that ​book./Bring that ​book to me. I brought my ​daughter to the ​office. [M] Next ​time you come, bring ​yourboyfriend along. [M] It ​started raining, so I brought in the ​laundry. This ​broadcast was brought to you (= ​paid for) by Powdermilk Biscuits.
  • bring verb [T] (CAUSE)

to ​cause, ​result in, or ​produce a ​state: The ​rain brought some ​relief from this ​heat. The ​explosion brought the ​buildingcrashing to the ​ground. What brings you here? Prosecutors brought ​charges against the program’s ​director. Funding ​cuts brought an end to the ​project. Wicks brought her to the ​attention of a ​movieproducer.
  • bring verb [T] (FORCE)

to make yourself do something that you do not ​want to do: I couldn’t bring myself to ​disappoint her.
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"bring" in Business English

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bringverb [T]

uk   us   /brɪŋ/ (brought, brought)
to make something come to a particular ​place, ​point, or ​level: Producers need to bring ​oilproduction to ​levels that ​create more ​stable and more ​sustainableoilprices.
to ​create or ​produce a particular ​state or ​condition: bring sth to an end/close Without ​warning, she suddenly brought the ​interview to an end.
LAW to make or begin something as ​part of an ​officiallegalprocess: bring a case/lawsuit/charge against sb Detectives believe they have enough ​evidence to bring ​charges against the ​chieffinancialofficer.
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bring” in British English

“bring” in American English

“bring” in Business English

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