Meaning of “bring sth in” in the English Dictionary

"bring sth in" in British English

See all translations

bring sth in

phrasal verb with bring uk /brɪŋ/ us /brɪŋ/ verb [ T ] brought, brought

(INTRODUCE)

to introduce something new such as a product or a law:

New safety regulations have been brought in.

More examples

  • The building industry brought in rules to protect customers from sharp practice.
  • There's a good case against bringing in new regulations.
  • Stringent safety regulations were brought in after the accident.
  • Such unpopular legislation is unlikely to be brought in before the next election.
  • Stringent measures were brought in so that the government could balance its budget.

(MONEY)

to make money:

Their chain of restaurants brings in millions of dollars a year.

More examples

  • The company employs 1,400 people and brings in about $240 million a year in sales.
  • The new product brought in $77 million last year.
  • Despite a promising start, the company brought in less than £20,000 this year.
  • It's a terrible movie yet it brought in $200 million.
  • The new product has been incredibly successful, bringing in about £1 million a month.

(Definition of “bring sth in” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bring sth in" in Business English

See all translations

bring sth in

phrasal verb with bring uk /brɪŋ/ us verb [ T ] brought, brought

to introduce something new such as a product or a law:

New safety regulations have been brought in.

to make a particular amount of money:

The merger should bring in more than $300m of extra sales revenue.

(Definition of “bring sth in” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)