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Meaning of “bring” in the English Dictionary

"bring" in British English

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bringverb [T]

uk   /brɪŋ/ us   /brɪŋ/ brought, brought
  • bring verb [T] (TOWARDS PLACE)

A2 to take or carry someone or something to a place or a person, or in the direction of the person speaking: "Shall I bring anything to the party?" "Oh, just a bottle." [+ two objects] Bring me that knife/Bring that knife to me. Can you help me bring in the shopping (= take it into the house)? The police brought several men in for questioning (= took them to the police station because they might have been involved in a crime). When they visit us they always bring their dog with them.

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  • bring verb [T] (CAUSE)

B1 to cause, result in, or produce a state or condition: [+ two objects] She's brought us so much happiness over the years. [+ -ing verb] The explosion brought the whole building crashing to the ground. Several trees were brought down (= made to fall) by the storm. The closure of the factory brought poverty to the town (= resulted in it becoming poor). Bring the water to the boil (= make it start boiling). She suddenly brought the interview to an end. Her tragic story brought tears to my eyes (= made me cry). What will the future bring for these refugees?
bring sb to sth
to cause someone to come to a particular place or thing: This subject brings me to the second part of the discussion. What brings you (= why have you come) to Miami?

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(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bring" in American English

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bringverb [T]

us   /brɪŋ/ past tense and past participle brought /brɔt/
  • bring verb [T] (TAKE)

to take or carry someone or something to a place or a person, or in the direction of the person speaking: Bring me that book./Bring that book to me. I brought my daughter to the office. [M] Next time you come, bring your boyfriend along. [M] It started raining, so I brought in the laundry. This broadcast was brought to you (= paid for) by Powdermilk Biscuits.
  • bring verb [T] (CAUSE)

to cause, result in, or produce a state: The rain brought some relief from this heat. The explosion brought the building crashing to the ground. What brings you here? Prosecutors brought charges against the program’s director. Funding cuts brought an end to the project. Wicks brought her to the attention of a movie producer.
  • bring verb [T] (FORCE)

to make yourself do something that you do not want to do: I couldn’t bring myself to disappoint her.
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"bring" in Business English

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bringverb [T]

uk   /brɪŋ/ us   brought, brought
to make something come to a particular place, point, or level: Producers need to bring oil production to levels that create more stable and more sustainable oil prices.
to create or produce a particular state or condition: bring sth to an end/close Without warning, she suddenly brought the interview to an end.
LAW to make or begin something as part of an official legal process: bring a case/lawsuit/charge against sb Detectives believe they have enough evidence to bring charges against the chief financial officer.
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bring” in British English

“bring” in American English

“bring” in Business English

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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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