burst Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “burst” in the English Dictionary

"burst" in British English

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burstverb

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/ (burst, burst)
B2 [I or T] to ​breakopen or ​apartsuddenly, or to make something do this: I ​hate it when ​balloons burst. Suddenly the ​door burst open (= ​openedsuddenly and ​forcefully) and ​policeofficersrushed in. The ​river was ​threatening to burst ​its banks.figurative humorous If I ​eat any more ​cake I'll burst (= I cannot ​eat anything ​else)!C2 [I] to ​feel a ​strongemotion, or ​strongwish to do something: I ​knew they were bursting withcuriosity but I said nothing. [+ to infinitive] Tom was bursting totell everyone the ​news.UK informal I'm bursting to go to the ​loo!burst into flames C2 to ​suddenlyburnstrongly, ​producing a lot of ​flames: Smoke ​startedpouring out from ​underneath, then the ​truck burst into ​flames.

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burstnoun [C]

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"burst" in American English

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burstverb [I/T]

 us   /bɜrst/ (past tense and past participle burst)
to ​breakopen or ​apartsuddenly, or to ​cause something to ​breakopen or ​apart: [I] Fireworks burst ​across the ​nightsky. [T] I ​thought I might have burst a ​bloodvessel. fig. A ​person who is bursting is ​extremelyeager or ​enthusiastic: [I] I was bursting with ​excitement.

burstnoun [C]

 us   /bɜrst/
a ​sudden, ​briefincrease in something, or a ​shortappearance of something: With a burst of ​speed, the ​horsewoneasily.
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“burst” in British English

“burst” in American English

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