burst Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “burst” in the English Dictionary

"burst" in British English

See all translations

burstverb

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/ (burst, burst)
B2 [I or T] to break open or apart suddenly, or to make something do this: I hate it when balloons burst. Suddenly the door burst open (= opened suddenly and forcefully) and police officers rushed in. The river was threatening to burst its banks.figurative humorous If I eat any more cake I'll burst (= I cannot eat anything else)!
C2 [I] to feel a strong emotion, or strong wish to do something: I knew they were bursting with curiosity but I said nothing. [+ to infinitive] Tom was bursting to tell everyone the news.UK informal I'm bursting to go to the loo!
burst into flames
C2 to suddenly burn strongly, producing a lot of flames: Smoke started pouring out from underneath, then the truck burst into flames.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

burstnoun [C]

uk   /bɜːst/  us   /bɝːst/
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"burst" in American English

See all translations

burstverb [I/T]

 us   /bɜrst/ (past tense and past participle burst)
to break open or apart suddenly, or to cause something to break open or apart: [I] Fireworks burst across the night sky. [T] I thought I might have burst a blood vessel.
fig. A person who is bursting is extremely eager or enthusiastic: [I] I was bursting with excitement.

burstnoun [C]

 us   /bɜrst/
a sudden, brief increase in something, or a short appearance of something: With a burst of speed, the horse won easily.
(Definition of burst from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of burst?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“burst” in British English

“burst” in American English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Read More 

Word of the Day

droid

a robot (= a machine controlled by computer) that is made to look like a human

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More