bury Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “bury” in the English Dictionary

"bury" in British English

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buryverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈber.i/
B1 to put a ​deadbody into the ​ground: His ​father is buried in the ​cemetery on the ​hill.
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B2 to put something into a ​hole in the ​ground and ​cover it: The ​dogtrotted off to bury ​itsbone. buried treasure usually passive to ​cover something or someone ​completely with a ​largequantity of something: If an ​avalanchestrikes, ​skiers can be buried alive by ​snow.C2 to put something in a ​place where it is ​difficult or ​impossible to ​find or ​see: I ​found the ​article buried (away) in the ​businesssection of the ​newspaper. She buried her ​face in her ​hands and ​began to ​sob. to ​intentionallyforget an ​unpleasantexperience: He'd had to bury his ​pain over the ​years. old-fashioned If someone says they buried someone, usually a ​closerelation, they ​mean that the ​persondied: She buried both her ​parents last ​year.

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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of bury from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bury" in American English

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buryverb [T]

 us   /ˈber·i/
to put a ​deadbody into the ​ground: My ​father is buried in Kentucky. To bury something is also to put it into the ​ground: Squirrels bury ​nuts and ​dig them up ​later to ​eat them. To bury something is also to ​hide it or to make it ​difficult to ​find: She buried her ​face in her ​hands. The ​article was buried in the ​middle of the ​newspaper.
(Definition of bury from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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