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Meaning of “bust” in the English Dictionary

"bust" in British English

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bustnoun [C]

uk   /bʌst/ us   /bʌst/

bustverb [T]

uk   /bʌst/ us   /bʌst/ busted or UK also bust, busted or UK also bust
  • bust verb [T] (ARREST)

US slang When the police bust a person, they arrest them, or when they bust a building or a place, they arrest people in it who they believe are breaking the law: The police busted him because they think he's involved with a terrorist group.
Phrasal verbs

bustadjective

uk   /bʌst/ us   /bʌst/
  • bust adjective (BUSINESS)

go bust
If a company goes bust, it is forced to close because it is financially unsuccessful: More than 20 companies in the district went bust during the last three months.
(Definition of bust from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bust" in American English

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bustverb [I/T]

us   /bʌst/ infml
to burst or break something: [I always + adv/prep] He busted out laughing. [M] The cops had to bust the door down.
slang A person who is busted is caught doing something wrong, esp. caught by the police and accused of a crime.

bustnoun [C]

us   /bʌst/
  • bust noun [C] (STATUE)

a statue of the upper part of a person’s body: a bust of George Washington
  • bust noun [C] (BREASTS)

a woman’s breasts, or the measurement around a woman’s body at the level of her breasts
  • bust noun [C] (BREAK)

slang an occasion when people are caught by the police and accused of a crime
(Definition of bust from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"bust" in Business English

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bustnoun [C]

uk   /bʌst/ us   ECONOMICS, FINANCE
a period of slow economic activity and lack of growth: Each of the previous booms in real house prices was followed by a bust. Employment soared during the 90s, only to plunge by nearly a third in the bust. the dot-com/housing/oil bust
Compare
informal a failure: Our attempt to start a new company was a complete bust.
See also

bustadjective

uk   /bʌst/ us   informal FINANCE
go bust
if a company goes bust, it is forced to close because it is financially unsuccessful: He believes that banks should be allowed to go bust. A thousand employees lost their jobs when the company went bust.
(Definition of bust from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bust?
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“bust” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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