busy Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “busy” in the English Dictionary

"busy" in British English

See all translations

busyadjective

uk   /ˈbɪz.i/  us   /ˈbɪz.i/
  • busy adjective (DOING THINGS)

A2 If you are busy, you are ​working hard, or giving ​yourattention to a ​particular thing: Mum was busy in the ​kitchen. The ​kids are busy withtheirhomework. She's busy ​writing out the ​weddinginvitations. I've got plenty of ​jobs to keep you busy. He was too busy ​talking tonotice us come in.
A1 A busy ​place is ​full of ​activity or ​people: a busy ​restaurant Their ​house is near a very busy ​road.
A2 In a busy ​period, you have a lot of things to do: I have a busy ​weekahead of me. You've had a busy ​day.
(UK also engaged) If a ​phoneline is busy, someone is using it: I ​triedcalling you but the ​line was busy.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

busyverb

uk   /ˈbɪz.i/  us   /ˈbɪz.i/
(Definition of busy from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"busy" in American English

See all translations

busyadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /ˈbɪz·i/
(of a ​person) ​activelyinvolved in doing something or having a lot of things to do, or (of a ​time or ​place) when or where a lot of things are ​happening: a busy ​street the busy ​summermonths I’ve been so busy ​lately that I haven’t had ​time to have any ​sociallife. Getting the ​houseready for her ​relativeskept her busy the ​wholeday.
If a ​telephone is busy, it is being used by someone ​else: Her ​line is still busy.

busyverb [T]

 /ˈbɪz·i/
to make the ​timepass by doing something: Aimee busied herself with a ​favoritebook.
(Definition of busy from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"busy" in Business English

See all translations

busyadjective

uk   us   /ˈbɪzi/
working hard, or giving your ​attention to a particular thing: too busy to do sth I have been far too busy to ​think about taking ​time off.busy with sth/sb All our ​agents are ​currently busy with other ​customers.busy doing sth While we were busy ​planning our ​expansion, he was ​planning to take over the ​company.a busy man/woman/person I won't take up much of your ​time, because I know you're a busy woman.
full of ​activity or ​people: a busy ​office/​restaurant/street The ​shop is always busy on Saturdays.
in a busy ​period, you have a lot of things to do: a busy week/day/morning It’s been a busy week.
( UK also engaged) COMMUNICATIONS if a ​telephoneline is busy, someone is using it: I ​triedcalling the ​office, but the ​line was busy.
(Definition of busy from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of busy?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“busy” in American English

“busy” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More