capacity Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “capacity” in the English Dictionary

"capacity" in British English

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capacitynoun

uk   /kəˈpæs.ə.ti/  us   /-t̬i/
  • capacity noun (AMOUNT)

B2 [C or S or U] the ​totalamount that can be ​contained or ​produced, or (​especially of a ​person or ​organization) the ​ability to do a ​particular thing: The ​stadium has a seating capacity of 50,000. The ​game was ​watched by a capacity crowd/​audience of 50,000 (= the ​place was ​completelyfull). She has a ​great capacity for hard ​work. The ​purchase of 500 ​tanks is ​part of a ​strategy to ​increasemilitary capacity by 25 ​percent over the next five ​years. [+ to infinitive] It ​seems to be beyond his capacity to (= he ​seems to be ​unable to)followsimpleinstructions. Do you ​think it's within his capacity to (= do you ​think he'll be ​able to) do the ​job without making a ​mess of it? The ​generators each have a capacity of (= can ​produce) 1,000 ​kilowatts. The ​largercars have ​bigger capacity ​engines (= the ​engines are ​bigger and more ​powerful). All ​ourfactories are ​working at (​full) capacity (= are ​producinggoods as ​fast as ​possible). We are ​running below capacity (= not ​producing as many ​goods as we are ​able to) because of ​cancelledorders. He ​suffered a ​stroke in 2008, which ​left him ​unable to ​speak, but his mental capacity (= his ​ability to ​think and ​remember) wasn't ​affected.

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  • capacity noun (POSITION)

C1 [S] formal a ​particularposition or ​job: She ​guidestourists at the Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home in her capacity as a National Park Service ​ranger. She was ​speaking in her capacity as a ​novelist, ​rather than as a ​televisionpresenter.
(Definition of capacity from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"capacity" in American English

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capacitynoun [C/U]

 us   /kəˈpæs·ɪ·t̬i/
  • capacity noun [C/U] (AMOUNT)

the ​amount that can be ​held or ​produced by something: [C] The ​stadium has a ​seating capacity of 50,000. [U] The ​theater was ​full to capacity that ​night.
  • capacity noun [C/U] (ABILITY)

[C] the ​ability to do something in ​particular: He has an ​enormous capacity for ​work.
  • capacity noun [C/U] (POSITION)

[C] a ​particularposition or ​job; a ​role: She was ​speaking in her capacity as a ​judge.
(Definition of capacity from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"capacity" in Business English

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capacitynoun

uk   us   /kəˈpæsəti/
[S or U] the ​totalamount or ​number of things or ​people that something can ​hold: a capacity of sth The ​tanks have a capacity of 1000 ​litres.capacity audience/crowd The ​rallydrew a capacity crowd of 15,000 ​people (= the ​place, which ​held 15,000 ​people, was completely ​full).
[S or U] PRODUCTION the ​totalamount of something that can be ​produced: cut/expand/increase capacity They ​aim to ​expand capacity by 3 million ​barrels a day. All our ​factories are now ​working at ​full capacity.
[S or U] the ​ability of a ​person or ​organization to do something: capacity to do sth "Every ​industry has the capacity to go ​green," he says.capacity for sth Most ​people have little capacity for ​creativity in solving problems at ​work.
[S] WORKPLACE a particular ​position or ​job: sb's capacity as sth In her capacity as ​portfoliomanager, she has ​primaryresponsibility for making ​day-to-dayinvestment decisions. He ​attends Board ​meetings in an advisory capacity.
(Definition of capacity from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“capacity” in British English

“capacity” in Business English

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