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Meaning of “cast” in the English Dictionary

"cast" in British English

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castnoun

uk   /kɑːst/ us   /kæst/
  • cast noun (ACTORS)

B2 [C, + sing/pl verb] the actors in a film, play, or show: After the final performance the director threw a party for the cast. Part of the movie's success lies in the strength of the supporting cast (= the actors who were not playing the main parts).
  • cast noun (SHAPE)

[C] an object made by pouring hot liquid into a container and leaving it to become solid
in a cast UK also in plaster
If a part of your body is in a cast, it has a plaster cast around it to protect it while a broken bone repairs itself: My leg was in a cast for about six weeks.

castverb

uk   /kɑːst/ us   /kæst/ cast, cast
  • cast verb (ACTORS)

C2 [T] to choose actors to play particular parts in a play, film, or show: He was often cast as the villain. In her latest movie she was cast against type (= played a different character than the one she usually played or might be expected to play).figurative They like to cast the opposing political party as (= to say that they are) the party of high taxes.
See also

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • cast verb (THROW)

[T + adv/prep] literary to throw something: The knight cast the sword far out into the lake.
[I or T] (in fishing) to throw something, such as a line, into the water to catch fish with: He cast the line to the middle of the river.
  • cast verb (MAGIC)

cast a spell
C2 to use words thought to be magic, especially in order to have an effect on someone: The old woman cast a spell on the prince and he turned into a frog.figurative When I was 17, jazz cast its spell on me (= I started to like it very much).
(Definition of cast from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cast" in American English

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castverb [T]

us   /kæst/ past tense and past participle cast
  • cast verb [T] (CAUSE TO APPEAR)

to cause something to appear, as if by throwing something: People complained about the shadows cast by the new skyscraper. fig. A new scientific study may cast some light on (= help to explain) why women live longer than men.
In the sport of fishing, if you cast something, such as a line or a net, you throw it far into the water: We watched the trout fishermen casting their lines.
  • cast verb [T] (CHOOSE ACTORS)

to choose actors to play particular parts in a play, movie, or show, or to choose an actor for a part: They are casting the show in New York right now. She’s been cast as a young doctor in an upcoming movie.
  • cast verb [T] (SHAPE)

to make an object by pouring liquid, such as melted metal, into a shaped container to become hard: The bronze statue is being cast next week.
  • cast verb [T] (VOTE)

to give a vote: Altogether, 358 votes were cast.
Phrasal verbs

castnoun [C]

us   /kæst/
  • cast noun [C] (COVERING)

a hard covering used to keep a broken bone in the correct position and protect it until it heals
  • cast noun [C] (CHOSEN ACTORS)

all the actors in a movie, play, or show
  • cast noun [C] (SHAPE)

an object made in a particular shape by pouring a liquid substance into a container having that shape and letting the liquid harden
(Definition of cast from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"cast" in Business English

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castverb [T]

uk   /kɑːst/ us   cast, cast
cast a/your vote also cast a/your ballot
to vote: Building society members can today cast their votes on the biggest merger in building society history.
(Definition of cast from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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