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Meaning of “casual” in the English Dictionary

"casual" in British English

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casualadjective

uk   /ˈkæʒ.u.əl/  us   /ˈkæʒ.u.əl/
  • casual adjective (INFORMAL)

B1 Casual clothes are not formal or not suitable for special occasions: casual clothes

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casually
adverb uk   /ˈkæʒ.u.ə.li/  us   /ˈkæʒ.u.ə.li/
B2 She was dressed casually in shorts and a T-shirt.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"casual" in American English

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casualadjective

 us   /ˈkæʒ·u·əl/
  • casual adjective (NOT SERIOUS)

not serious or careful in attitude; only partly interested: a casual glance at a magazine Even to the casual observer, the forgery was obvious.
  • casual adjective (INFORMAL)

not formal; relaxed in style or manner: We have a small office and I am very casual and wear slacks and sports shirts and things like that.
  • casual adjective (TEMPORARY)

not regular or frequent; temporary or done sometimes: casual laborers
Casual also means slight: He was only a casual acquaintance – I didn’t know him well.
  • casual adjective (NOT PLANNED)

not intended or planned: a casual remark casual conversation
casually
adverb  us   /ˈkæʒ·ə·wə·li/
We were told to dress casually for the walking tour.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"casual" in Business English

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casualadjective

uk   /ˈkæʒjuəl/  us   /ˈkæʒuəl/
HR used to describe work that is not permanent, or workers that are not employed permanently but only when a company needs them: casual employee/worker/labourer Most casual workers are paid by the day or hour.casual work/jobs/labour After leaving school she had a range of casual jobs. She does not intend necessarily to give up work but may work on a casual basis.
WORKPLACE casual clothes are informal: casual clothes/dress/attire Research shows that 90% of US companies now allow casual dress regularly. The style of dress in the office could best be described as business casual rather than formal.

casualnoun

uk   /ˈkæʒjuəl/  us   /ˈkæʒuəl/ UK
[C] HR a worker who is not employed permanently but only when a company needs them: On the whole, semi-skilled and unskilled positions are filled by casuals.
casuals [plural]
WORKPLACE informal clothing: Last January, the firm dispensed with any requirement to wear business suits and about half the staff now opt for casuals.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“casual” in Business English

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