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Meaning of “casual” in the English Dictionary

"casual" in British English

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casualadjective

uk   /ˈkæʒ.u.əl/ us   /ˈkæʒ.u.əl/
  • casual adjective (INFORMAL)

B1 Casual clothes are not formal or not suitable for special occasions: casual clothes

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casually
adverb uk   /ˈkæʒ.u.ə.li/ us   /ˈkæʒ.u.ə.li/
B2 She was dressed casually in shorts and a T-shirt.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"casual" in American English

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casualadjective

us   /ˈkæʒ·u·əl/
  • casual adjective (NOT SERIOUS)

not serious or careful in attitude; only partly interested: a casual glance at a magazine Even to the casual observer, the forgery was obvious.
  • casual adjective (INFORMAL)

not formal; relaxed in style or manner: We have a small office and I am very casual and wear slacks and sports shirts and things like that.
  • casual adjective (TEMPORARY)

not regular or frequent; temporary or done sometimes: casual laborers
Casual also means slight: He was only a casual acquaintance – I didn’t know him well.
  • casual adjective (NOT PLANNED)

not intended or planned: a casual remark casual conversation
casually
adverb us   /ˈkæʒ·ə·wə·li/
We were told to dress casually for the walking tour.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"casual" in Business English

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casualadjective

uk   /ˈkæʒjuəl/ us   /ˈkæʒuəl/
HR used to describe work that is not permanent, or workers that are not employed permanently but only when a company needs them: casual employee/worker/labourer Most casual workers are paid by the day or hour.casual work/jobs/labour After leaving school she had a range of casual jobs. She does not intend necessarily to give up work but may work on a casual basis.
WORKPLACE casual clothes are informal: casual clothes/dress/attire Research shows that 90% of US companies now allow casual dress regularly. The style of dress in the office could best be described as business casual rather than formal.

casualnoun

uk   /ˈkæʒjuəl/ us   /ˈkæʒuəl/ UK
[C] HR a worker who is not employed permanently but only when a company needs them: On the whole, semi-skilled and unskilled positions are filled by casuals.
casuals [plural]
WORKPLACE informal clothing: Last January, the firm dispensed with any requirement to wear business suits and about half the staff now opt for casuals.
(Definition of casual from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“casual” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
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by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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