cause Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “cause” in the English Dictionary

"cause" in British English

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causenoun

uk   /kɔːz/ us   /kɑːz/
  • cause noun (REASON)

B2 [C or U] the reason why something, especially something bad, happens: The police are still trying to establish the cause of the fire. She had died of natural causes. I wouldn't tell you without (good) cause (= if there was not a (good) reason). I believe we have/there is just cause (= a fair reason) for taking this action.
C2 [U] a reason to feel something or to behave in a particular way: He's never given me any cause for concern.

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  • cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

C1 [C] a socially valuable principle that is strongly supported by some people: They are fighting for a cause - the liberation of their people. I'll sponsor you for £10 - it's all in a good cause.

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causeverb [T]

uk   /kɔːz/ us   /kɑːz/
B2 to make something happen, especially something bad: The difficult driving conditions caused several accidents. [+ obj + to infinitive ] The bright light caused her to blink. Most heart attacks are caused by blood clots. [+ two objects] I hope the children haven't caused you too much trouble.

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causeconjunction

also 'cause uk   /kɒz/ us   /kɑːz/ informal
(Definition of cause from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cause" in American English

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causenoun

us   /kɔz/
  • cause noun (REASON)

[C/U] something without which something else would not happen: [C] The investigation will determine the cause of the airplane accident. [C] She studied the causes of human behavior.
[C/U] Cause is also reason for doing or feeling something: [U] He had just cause to feel disturbed by these events. [U] There is no cause for alarm.
  • cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

[C] an idea or principle strongly supported by some people: He devoted himself to charitable causes and gave away millions of dollars.
cause
verb [T] us   /kɔz/
The wind and rain caused several accidents.
(Definition of cause from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“cause” in American English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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