Meaning of “cause” in the English Dictionary

"cause" in British English

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causenoun

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

cause noun (REASON)

B2 [ C or U ] the reason why something, especially something bad, happens:

The police are still trying to establish the cause of the fire.
She had died of natural causes.
I wouldn't tell you without (good) cause (= if there was not a (good) reason).
I believe we have/there is just cause (= a fair reason) for taking this action.

C2 [ U ] a reason to feel something or to behave in a particular way:

He's never given me any cause for concern.

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cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

C1 [ C ] a socially valuable principle that is strongly supported by some people:

They are fighting for a cause - the liberation of their people.
I'll sponsor you for £10 - it's all in a good cause.

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causeverb [ T ]

uk /kɔːz/ us /kɑːz/

causeconjunction

also 'cause uk /kɒz/ us /kɑːz/ informal

(Definition of “cause” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cause" in American English

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causenoun

us /kɔz/

cause noun (REASON)

[ C/U ] something without which something else would not happen:

[ C ] The investigation will determine the cause of the airplane accident.
[ C ] She studied the causes of human behavior.

[ C/U ] Cause is also reason for doing or feeling something:

[ U ] He had just cause to feel disturbed by these events.
[ U ] There is no cause for alarm.

cause noun (PRINCIPLE)

[ C ] an idea or principle strongly supported by some people:

He devoted himself to charitable causes and gave away millions of dollars.
cause
verb [ T ] us /kɔz/

The wind and rain caused several accidents.

(Definition of “cause” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)