caution Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “caution” in the English Dictionary

"caution" in British English

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cautionnoun

uk   /ˈkɔː.ʃən/  us   /ˈkɑː-/

caution noun (CARE)

C1 [U] greatcare and ​attention: We need to proceed with/​exercise caution (= be ​careful in taking ​action, making ​decisions, etc.) They treated the ​story of his ​escape with (some/​great/​extreme) caution (= ​thought that it might not be ​true).

caution noun (WARNING)

[C] UK a ​spokenwarning given by a ​policeofficer or ​official to someone who has ​broken the ​law: As it was her first ​offence, she was only given a caution. [C or U] advice or a ​warning: Just a word of caution - the ​cheapermodelsprobably aren't ​worthbuying.

caution noun (FOOTBALL)

[C] a ​punishment for ​breaking the ​rules in a ​footballgame in which the ​referee writes the player's ​name in a ​book and ​holds up a ​yellowcard
Synonym

cautionverb [T]

uk   /ˈkɔː.ʃən/  us   /ˈkɑː-/

caution verb [T] (police)

UK If the ​police caution someone, they give them an ​officialwarning.C2 formal to ​warn someone: The ​newspaper cautioned ​itsreaders againstbuyingshares without getting good ​advice first.

caution verb [T] (FOOTBALL)

If a ​footballreferee cautions a ​player, he ​punishes them for ​breaking the ​rules by writing ​theirname in a ​book and ​holding up a ​yellowcard.
Synonym
(Definition of caution from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"caution" in American English

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cautionnoun

 us   /ˈkɔ·ʃən/
[C] a ​warning: It’s a good ​time to ​invest, he said, but a word of caution is in ​order.
[U] carefulattention: Use caution when ​approaching the ​railroadcrossing.
cautionary
adjective  us   /ˈkɔ·ʃəˌner·i/
Some ​saw the ​fatalcrash as a cautionary ​tale about the use of ​cellphones while ​driving.

cautionverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈkɔ·ʃən/
to ​warn someone about a ​possibleproblem or ​danger: [T] They cautioned her not to ​walk through the ​park at ​night. [I always + adv/prep] Experts caution against ​reading too much into the ​decline of ​stockmarketprices.
(Definition of caution from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"caution" in Business English

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cautionnoun

uk   us   /ˈkɔːʃən/
[U] care and ​attention in ​order to ​avoidrisk or possible problems: The latest ​figures suggest that ​consumer caution has ​increased in recent months. Those ​keen on ​investing in ​smallcompanies should ​proceed with caution.great/extreme caution The ​letteroutlines that ​customers should ​treat any ​email appearing to be from their ​bank with great caution.exercise/use caution Investors are urged to ​exercise caution to ​avoid the less ​reputablecompanies. advise/urge caution
err on the side of caution to decide to take ​care rather than take any ​risks: Given the ​uncertainties in the ​market, it would be far better to err on the ​side of caution.
throw caution to the wind to decide not to worry about possible dangers or ​risks: Faced with one of the worst ​financialcrises in recent ​memory, British ​investors threw caution to the wind and scrambled to ​buystocks.
sound/strike a note of caution to warn someone about something: The Committee sounded a ​note of caution, saying the ​extramoneyentering the ​economy may ​push up ​inflation.

cautionverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkɔːʃən/
to warn someone about something: caution that Economists caution that ​retailsalestaxcollectionsrepresent about half of all ​retailspending.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of caution from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“caution” in American English

“caution” in Business English

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