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Meaning of “chain” in the English Dictionary

"chain" in British English

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chainnoun

uk   /tʃeɪn/  us   /tʃeɪn/
  • chain noun (CONNECTED THINGS)

B2 [C] a set of ​connected or ​related things: She has ​built up a chain of ​180bookshopsacross the ​country. His ​resignation was ​followed by a ​remarkable chain of ​events.

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  • chain noun (RINGS)

A2 [C or U] (a ​length of) ​rings usually made of ​metal that are ​connected together and used for ​fastening, ​pulling, ​supporting, or ​limitingfreedom, or as ​jewellery: The ​gates were ​locked with a ​padlock and a ​heavysteel chain. Put the chain on the ​door if you are ​alone in the ​house. Mary was ​wearing a ​beautifulsilver chain around her ​neck.
in chains
tied with chains: The ​hostages were ​kept in chains for 23 ​hours a ​day.
[plural] a ​fact or ​situation that ​limits a person's ​freedom: At last the ​country has ​freed itself from the chains of the ​authoritarianregime.
  • chain noun (HOUSE SALE)

[C] UK a ​situation in which someone ​selling a ​house cannot ​complete the ​sale because the ​person who ​wants to ​buy it ​needs to ​selltheirhouse first: Some ​sellersrefuse to ​exchangecontracts with ​buyers who are in a chain.

chainverb [T usually + adv/prep]

uk   /tʃeɪn/  us   /tʃeɪn/
to ​fasten someone or something using a chain: It's so ​cruel to ​keep a ​pony chained up like that all the ​time. They chained themselves tolampposts in ​protest at the judge's ​decision.figurative I don't ​want a ​job where I'm chained to a ​desk for eight ​hours a ​day.
(Definition of chain from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"chain" in American English

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chainnoun [C]

 us   /tʃeɪn/
  • chain noun [C] (CONNECTED RINGS)

a ​length of ​metalrings that are ​connected together and used for ​fastening or ​supporting, and in ​machinery: She looped the chain around her ​bike and ​locked it to the ​fence.
A chain is also a ​length of ​connectedringsworn as ​jewelry: Mary ​wore a ​silver chain around her ​neck.
  • chain noun [C] (RELATED THINGS)

a set of ​connected or ​related things: a ​mountain chain a chain of ​supermarkets That set in ​motion a chain of ​events that ​changed her ​lifeforever.

chainverb [T]

 us   /tʃeɪn/
  • chain verb [T] (ATTACH)

to ​tie or ​connect together with a chain: An ​oldbicycle was chained to a ​post near the ​frontdoor.
If you are chained to something, you ​work for ​longperiods with it: I had no ​intention of ​spending my ​day chained to the ​stove.
(Definition of chain from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"chain" in Business English

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chainnoun [C]

uk   us   /tʃeɪn/
COMMERCE a ​group of similar ​businesses, such as ​restaurants or ​hotels, which are all ​owned and ​controlled by the same ​organization: hotel/supermarket/fast-food chain The well-known fast-food chain has ​expanded to over 20,000 ​restaurants in 17 countries. chain ​restaurants/​stores/​retailers a chain of ​supermarkets/​bookstores/​departmentstores
a ​system of ​people, ​processes, or ​organizations that ​work together in a particular ​order: This ​unitexamines the ​stages in the chain of ​production of tea, from the ​leaves in Sri Lanka to the cup in the UK.chain of command/power/authority Employee ​complaints were taken all the way up the ​corporate chain of ​command.
UK PROPERTY a ​situation in which someone cannot complete the ​sale of their ​house because the ​person who ​wants to ​buy it ​needs to ​sell their ​house first: Some ​housesellersrefuse to ​exchangecontracts with ​buyers who are in a chain
(Definition of chain from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“chain” in Business English

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