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Meaning of “check” in the English Dictionary

"check" in British English

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checkverb

uk   /tʃek/ us   /tʃek/
  • check verb (EXAMINE)

A2 [I or T] to make certain that something or someone is correct, safe, or suitable by examining it, him, or her quickly: You should always check your oil, water, and tyres before taking your car on a long trip. Customs stopped us and checked (= searched) our bags for alcohol and cigarettes. After I'd finished the exam, I checked my answers for mistakes. The doctor will call next week to check on your progress. I check on (= visits) our elderly neighbour every few days to make sure that he's alright. [+ (that)] I always check (that) I've shut the windows before I leave the house. He double-checked all the doors (= checked them all twice) before leaving the house.
See also
B1 [I or T] to find out about something: [+ question word] I called them yesterday to check when they were arriving. [+ to infinitive] If you're near the garage, could you check to see (= ask) if the car's ready? If you're unsure of your legal rights, I would check with (= ask) a lawyer.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • check verb (LEAVE)

UK usually check in [T] mainly US to give your bags to airport employees to be put on a plane for you, rather than carrying them on and off the plane yourself : I got my boarding pass and checked my suitcase. Many airlines charge extra for checked bags/baggage/luggage.
[T] mainly US to leave something with someone at a particular place, so that they can take care of it for a short time: It was hot so we checked our coats before going round the gallery.
  • check verb (AGREE)

[I] mainly US If information checks, it agrees with other information: Her statement checks with most of the eye-witness reports.
  • check verb (MARK)

A1 mainly US UK usually tick [I or T] to mark something with a check: Check (off) each item on the list as you complete it.

checknoun

uk   /tʃek/ us   /tʃek/
  • check noun (EXAMINATION)

B1 [C] an examination of something in order to make certain that it is correct or the way it should be: The soldiers gave their equipment a final check before setting off. "I can't find my keys." "Have another check in/through your jacket pockets." Security checks have become really strict at the airport. The police are carrying out spot checks on (= quick examinations of a limited number of) drivers over the Christmas period to test for alcohol levels. It's my job to keep a check on stock levels. I'll just run a check on (= find information about) that name for you in the computer.

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  • check noun (RESTAURANT)

A2 US [C] a bill noun in a restaurant, etc.: Can I have the check, please?
  • check noun (MARK)

A2 [C] mainly US UK usually tick a mark (✓) that shows that something is correct or has been done: Put a check by/against the names of the people who have accepted the invitation.
  • check noun (CHESS)

[U] specialized games in chess, the act of directly attacking the other player's king: I think I should have given check (= attacked my opponent's king) at move 23 instead of trying to find a safer square for the rook.
in check specialized
If your king is in check in chess, it is being directly attacked by the other player: Your king is in check from my knight.
Compare

checkexclamation

uk   /tʃek/ us   /tʃek/
  • check exclamation (YES)

mainly US used to say yes to someone who is making certain that all the things on a list have been dealt with or included: "Did you bring your sleeping bag?" "Check." "Pillow?" "Check."
(Definition of check from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"check" in American English

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checkverb

us   /tʃek/
  • check verb (EXAMINE)

[I/T] to look at or give your attention to something to get information, often to help you decide if something is correct, safe, or suitable: [+ to infinitive] Check to see what the weather is like outside. [T] I brought the car to the garage to have the brakes checked. [T] We checked our records for any information about him. [I] We have a claim for lost luggage, and we are checking into it. [T] The doctors checked his heart and said it was fine. [T] Before you hand in your papers, check your spelling.
  • check verb (STOP)

[T] to stop someone from doing or saying something, or to prevent something from increasing or continuing: He started to interrupt but checked himself and said nothing. The program is designed to check the spread of malaria.
  • check verb (LEAVE)

[T] to leave your outer clothing or property temporarily in the care of someone else, usually as a convenience: Let’s check our coats before going through the galleries. Passengers on this flight will be allowed one carry-on bag, and will have to check any additional bags.
  • check verb (MARK)

[T] to mark items to show your preferences: Check the box corresponding to the correct answer to each question.

checknoun

us   /tʃek/
  • check noun (MONEY)

[C] a printed form, used instead of money, to make payments from your bank account: I’ve got to cash my pay check. She wrote me a check for $120.
  • check noun (PATTERN)

[C] a pattern made of different colored squares, or one of these squares: The shirt has a pattern of blue and yellow checks.
  • check noun (MARK)

[C] a sign (✓) that shows that something is correct or done or has been examined: Put a check next to the names of the people who have already paid for their tickets.
  • check noun (REQUEST FOR PAYMENT)

[C] a request for payment of money owed to a restaurant, or the piece of paper on which it is written: Waiter, may I have the check, please?
  • check noun (EXAMINATION)

[C] the act of looking at or giving your attention to something to get information, often to help you decide if something is correct, safe, or suitable: The FBI did a thorough background check on him (= looked into his past experience and relationships).
  • check noun (STOP)

a way to stop someone from doing or saying something, or to prevent something from increasing or continuing: New rules would put a check on rising interest rates.
  • check noun (LEAVE)

[C] the ticket or small object that you are given and that you use to get back your coat or other personal possessions left in the care of someone else for a short period: I thought I put the coat check in my pocket.
Idioms
(Definition of check from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"check" in Business English

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checkverb

uk   /tʃek/ us  
[I or T] to make certain that something or someone is correct, safe, or suitable, for example by examining it or them, or by asking someone: When the shipment arrived, she checked to make sure nothing was broken. A security officer checked our bags at the entrance to the building. I'd like to check my bank balance, please.check on sth The supervisor will check on your progress next week.check (sth) for sth Always check your reports for spelling errors before you hand them in.check (sth) with sb Please could you check the figures with the sales manager?check that Check that you have all the necessary documentation before you travel.
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[T] to prevent something from increasing or continuing: Our first priority is to control public spending and check inflation. We tried to check the spread of the rumour that the company was being sold.
[T] to leave something with someone at a particular place, so that they can take care of it for a short time, or so it can be put on a plane or train: Please check your coats at the coatroom prior to the meeting. He checked his baggage as soon as he got to the airport. These articles may only be carried in checked baggage.
[T] to make a mark next to an item on a list, or to click on a checkbox on a computer screen in order to make a choice: Please check the box above to agree to our terms and conditions.
See also
[I] if information checks, it makes it likely that other information is true: check with sth Her statement checks with most of the eye-witness reports.

checknoun [C]

uk   /tʃek/ us  
US BANKING →  cheque
→  check mark : Put a check beside each item that you wish to order.
See also
an examination of something in order to make certain that it is correct or the way that it should be: give sth a check Give the invoice another check before you seal the carton.carry out/do a check (on/of sth) They carried out a check of all the electrical equipment. regular/routine check A regular check is done on all our equipment.quick/thorough check All these documents will need a thorough check before you send them off.keep a check on sth It's my job to keep a check on stock levels. Security checks at airports have become very strict.
an examination of somebody to see if they are healthy or have a medical problem: health/medical check Purchasers of the policy will be required to undergo a medical check.
US UK bill COMMERCE a piece of paper given to you when you have finished eating at a restaurant, showing how much money you owe: Can we have the check, please?
something that stops something else from increasing or getting worse: keep a check on sth The new administration is expected to keep a tight check on inflation.act/serve as a check on sth These controls are designed to act as a check on fraud.
hold/keep sth in check
to put a limit on something so that it does not increase or become worse: We must find ways of keeping our expenditure in check.
checks and balances
GOVERNMENT rules intended to prevent one person or group from having too much power within a country or an organization: A system of checks and balances exists to ensure that our government is truly democratic. Many executives amassed enormous power by ignoring the normal checks and balances of the financial world.
(Definition of check from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of check?
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