cheek Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “cheek” in the English Dictionary

"cheek" in British English

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cheeknoun

uk   /tʃiːk/ us   /tʃiːk/
  • cheek noun (FACE)

B1 [C] the soft part of your face that is below your eye and between your mouth and ear: The tears ran down her cheeks. rosy cheeks He embraced her, kissing her on both cheeks.

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  • cheek noun (BEHAVIOUR)

[S or U] UK behaviour or talk that is rude and shows no respect: He told me off for being late when he arrived half an hour after me. What a cheek! [+ to infinitive] She's got some cheek to take your car without asking. He had the cheek to ask me to pay for her! She's always getting into trouble for giving her teachers cheek (= being rude to them).

cheekverb [T]

uk   /tʃiːk/ us   /tʃiːk/ UK informal
to be rude to someone: He's always getting into trouble for cheeking his teachers.
(Definition of cheek from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cheek" in American English

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cheeknoun

us   /tʃik/
  • cheek noun (BODY PART)

[C] either side of your face below the eyes, where except at the top the skin has no bone behind it and is therefore soft: She welcomed me with a kiss on the cheek.
  • cheek noun (RUDE BEHAVIOR)

[U] rude behavior or lack of respect: [+ to infinitive] First he messed up my work and then he had the cheek to accuse me of being disorganized.
(Definition of cheek from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“cheek” in American English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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