choice Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “choice” in the English Dictionary

"choice" in British English

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choicenoun

uk   us   /tʃɔɪs/
  • choice noun (ACT)

B1 [C or U] an ​act or the ​possibility of ​choosing: If the ​product doesn't ​work, you are given the choice of a ​refund or a ​replacement. It's a ​difficult choice to make. It's ​your choice/The choice is yours (= only you can ​decide). It was a choice betweenpain now or ​painlater, so I ​chosepainlater. Now you ​know all the ​facts, you can make an informed choice. I'd ​prefer not to ​work but I don't have much choice (= this is not ​possible). He had no choice but toaccept (= he had to ​accept). Is she ​single by choice? Champagne is ​theirdrink of choice (= the one they most often ​drink).

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  • choice noun (VARIETY)

B1 [S or U] the ​range of different things from which you can ​choose: There wasn't much choice on the ​menu. The ​eveningmenuoffers a wide choice of ​dishes. The ​dress is ​available in a choice ofcolours.

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  • choice noun (PERSON/THING)

B1 [C] a ​person or thing that has been ​chosen or that can be ​chosen: Harvard was not his first choice. He wouldn't be my choice as a ​friend. This ​type of ​daycare may in ​fact be the ​best choice foryourchild.

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Idioms

choiceadjective

uk   us   /tʃɔɪs/
(Definition of choice from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"choice" in American English

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choicenoun

 us   /tʃɔɪs/
  • choice noun (ACT)

[C/U] an ​act of ​choosing; a ​decision: [C] a ​difficult/​easy choice [C] When you’re ​trying to ​cut the ​budgetdeficit, you’ve got to make ​tough choices.
  • choice noun (POSSIBILITY)

[C/U] the ​right to ​choose, or the ​possibility of ​choosing: [C] Well, I still ​thinkpeople have a choice. [C] Given a choice, what would you do? [C] I ​asked if I could have a choice which ​sciencecourse to take. [U] We have no choice but to ​drive to the ​airport (= That is the only thing we can do).
  • choice noun (VARIETY)

[C] a ​range of different things you can ​choose: [C] A ​wide choice of ​colors is ​available in this ​size.
  • choice noun (PERSON/THING)

[C] a ​person or thing that has been ​chosen or that can be ​chosen: She would be my first choice for the ​job.

choiceadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /tʃɔɪs/
of high ​quality: a choice ​cut of ​meat
(Definition of choice from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"choice" in Business English

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choicenoun [S or U]

uk   us   /tʃɔɪs/
a ​range of different things that are ​available to choose from: a choice of sb/sth Finding the best ​bankaccounttakes patience - there is a choice of more than 60.a choice between sth and sth When ​employees have a choice between taking a ​paycut or ​working more, they'd rather ​work more.no choice but to do sth Many ​high-risk borrowers had no choice but to ​accepthigherinterestrates. They ​offer only a limited choice of ​products. a wide/extensive/greater choice
of choice (for sb/sth) most popular or most commonly chosen for a particular ​purpose: Freelancing has become the ​career of choice for many ​people.
of your choice chosen by you: You may ​sell your ​shares through a ​broker of your choice.

choiceadjective

uk   us   /tʃɔɪs/
very good in ​quality, and ​worth having: They ​bought a choice ​piece of ​realestate in the heart of the city.
(Definition of choice from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“choice” in Business English

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