clap Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “clap” in the English Dictionary

"clap" in British English

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clapverb

uk   /klæp/  us   /klæp/ (-pp-)
  • clap verb (MAKE NOISE)

B1 [I or T] to make a short loud noise by hitting your hands together: "When I clap my hands, you stand still," said the teacher. The band played a familiar tune which had everyone clapping along. The audience clapped in time to the music.
B1 [I or T] to clap your hands repeatedly to show that you like or admire someone or have enjoyed a performance: The audience clapped and cheered when she stood up to speak. We all clapped his performance enthusiastically.

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clapnoun

uk   /klæp/  us   /klæp/
(Definition of clap from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"clap" in American English

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clapverb

 us   /klæp/ (-pp-)
  • clap verb (PUT HANDS TOGETHER)

[I/T] to make a short, loud noise by hitting your hands together: [T] She clapped her hands to call the dog in.
[I/T] People will clap at the end of a speech or a performance to show that they are pleased: [I] Everyone was clapping and cheering.
  • clap verb (HIT LIGHTLY)

[T always + adv/prep] to hit someone lightly on the shoulder or back in a friendly way to express pleasure: The governor clapped him on the back and congratulated him.

clapnoun [C]

 us   /klæp/
  • clap noun [C] (PUTTING HANDS TOGETHER)

the act of hitting your hands together to make a short, loud noise, esp. at the end of a speech or performance to show that you are pleased: There were a few claps, and then embarrassing silence.
A clap of thunder is the sudden, loud noise of thunder.
(Definition of clap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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