clash Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “clash” in the English Dictionary

"clash" in British English

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uk   us   /klæʃ/

clash verb (FIGHT)

C2 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​fight or ​argue: Students clashed withpolice after ​demonstrations at five ​universities. The ​government and the ​oppositionparties have clashed over the ​cuts in ​defencespending. [I] If two ​opinions, ​statements, or ​qualities clash, they are very different from each other: This ​lateststatement from the White House clashes withimportantaspects of US ​foreignpolicy.

clash verb (COMPETE)

[I] If two ​people or ​teams clash in a ​sportscompetition or ​race, they ​competeseriously against each other.

clash verb (NOT ATTRACTIVE)

C2 [I not continuous] If ​colours or ​styles clash, they ​lookugly or ​wrong together: I like ​red and ​orange together, though ​lots of ​peoplethink they clash.

clash verb (HAPPEN TOGETHER)

C2 [I not continuous] UK If two ​events clash, they ​happen at the same ​time in a way that is not ​convenient: Her ​party clashes with my brother's ​wedding, so I won't be ​able to go.

clash verb (LOUD NOISE)

[I or T] to make a ​loudnoise like ​metalhittingmetal, or to ​cause something to make this ​noise: The ​saucepans clashed as he ​piled them into the ​sink. She clashed the ​cymbals together.


uk   us   /klæʃ/

clash noun (FIGHT)

C2 [C] a ​fight or ​argument between ​people: Rioters ​hurledrocks and ​bottles in clashes withpolice at the ​weekend. There were ​violent clashes between the ​police and ​demonstrators in the ​citycentre.C2 [C usually singular] a ​situation in which people's ​opinions or ​qualities are very different from and ​opposed to each other: a clash of ​opinions/loyalties/​personalities
More examples

clash noun (COMPETITION)

[C] a ​sportscompetition or ​race between two ​people or ​teams

clash noun (NOT ATTRACTIVE)

[C] the ​fact of ​colours or ​styleslookingugly or ​wrong together


[C] UK the ​situation when two ​eventshappen at the same ​time in a way that is not ​convenient: In the new ​timetable, there's a clash betweenhistory and ​physics.

clash noun (LOUD NOISE)

[C] a ​loudnoise that ​sounds like ​metalhittingmetal: a clash of ​cymbals
(Definition of clash from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"clash" in American English

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 us   /klæʃ/

clash verb (FIGHT)

[I] to ​fight or ​disagree: The ​president and ​Congress clashed again over the ​budget.

clash verb (NOT MATCH)

[I] (of ​colors or ​styles) to ​lookugly or ​wrong together: I do not ​think that ​red clashes with ​orange.

clash verb (MAKING A SOUND)

[I/T] the ​act of making a ​loudsound like that made when ​metalobjectshit: [I] From the ​kitchen you could ​heardishes clashing as they were ​stacked.

clashnoun [C]

 us   /klæʃ/

clash noun [C] (SOUND)

a ​loudsound like that made when ​metalobjectshit

clash noun [C] (FIGHT)

a ​disagreement, or a ​fight that ​becomesviolent: a clash of ​interests/​personalities clashes between ​demonstrators and ​police
(Definition of clash from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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