classic Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “classic” in the English Dictionary

"classic" in British English

See all translations

classicadjective

uk   /ˈklæs.ɪk/ us   /ˈklæs.ɪk/
  • classic adjective (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 having a high quality or standard against which other things are judged: Fielding's classic novel "Tom Jones" Another classic goal there from Corley!

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • classic adjective (EXTREMELY FUNNY/BAD)

informal extremely or unusually funny, bad, or annoying: Then she fell over backwards into the flowerbed - it was absolutely classic! That was classic! That van-driver signalled right, and then turned left.
  • classic adjective (TYPICAL)

having all the characteristics or qualities that you expect: He's a classic example of a kid who's clever but lazy. He had all the classic symptoms of the disease.
informal disapproving bad or unpleasant, but not very surprising or unexpected: It's classic - you arrive at the station on time and find that the train's left early.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • classic adjective (TRADITIONAL)

having a simple, traditional style that is always fashionable: She wore a classic navy suit.

classicnoun

uk   /ˈklæs.ɪk/ us   /ˈklæs.ɪk/
  • classic noun (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 [C] a piece of writing, a musical recording, or a film that is well known and of a high standard and lasting value: Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" is a classic of English literature. Many of the Rolling Stones' records have become rock classics.
the classics [plural]
the most famous works of literature: I spent my childhood reading the classics.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • classic noun (STUDY)

classics [U]
the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture, especially their languages and literature: She studied/read classics at Cambridge. a classics scholar.
(Definition of classic from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"classic" in American English

See all translations

classicadjective

us   /ˈklæs·ɪk/
  • classic adjective (STANDARD)

being of a high standard against which others of the same type are judged: classic literature John Steinbeck's classic American novel, “The Grapes of Wrath”
  • classic adjective (TRADITIONAL)

traditional in design or style: She wore a classic blue suit and a straw hat.
  • classic adjective (TYPICAL)

having all the characteristics or qualities that are typical of something: The building is a classic example of poor design.

classicnoun [C]

us   /ˈklæs·ɪk/
  • classic noun [C] (STANDARD)

a well-known piece of writing, musical recording, or film which is of high quality and lasting value: Chaplin’s films are regarded as American classics.
(Definition of classic from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of classic?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More meanings of “classic”

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

Read More 

Word of the Day

ultraviolet

Ultraviolet light has a wavelength that is after the violet (= light purple) end of the range of colours that can be seen by humans. Light of this type causes the skin to become darker in the sun.

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More