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Meaning of “climb” in the English Dictionary

"climb" in British English

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climbverb

uk   /klaɪm/  us   /klaɪm/
  • climb verb (RISE)

B2 [I] to go up, or to go towards the top of something: The plane climbed quickly to a height of 30,000 feet. As it leaves the village, the road climbs steeply up the mountain. The sun climbed higher in the sky.
A2 [I or T] to use your legs, or your legs and hands, to go up or onto the top of something: to climb the stairs/mountain I hate climbing ladders. We're going climbing (= climbing mountains as a sport) in Scotland next weekend.
[I] If a price, number, or amount climbs, it increases: Our costs have climbed rapidly in the last few years.
[I] to move into a higher social position, or to improve your position at work: He quickly climbed to the top of his profession.

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  • climb verb (MOVE)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to move into or out of a small space awkwardly or with difficulty or effort: They climbed into the truck and drove away. We can't stop Tom climbing out of his cot.

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Phrasal verbs

climbnoun [C]

uk   /klaɪm/  us   /klaɪm/
an act or process of climbing: We were very tired after our climb. The climb down the mountain took longer than the climb up. I've made three climbs so far this year. Her climb to power has been very rapid.
a place or object to be climbed: The north face of the Eiger is a very difficult climb.
(Definition of climb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"climb" in American English

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climbverb

 us   /klɑɪm/
  • climb verb (RISE)

[I/T] to go up, or go up something or to the top of something: [I] We climbed to the top of the hill, where we had a great view. [T] She climbed the stairs to the third floor. [I] The plane is still climbing and will level off at 33,000 feet. [I] fig. As he climbed the corporate ladder (= moved into better and better positions in business), his salary increased dramatically.
[I/T] To climb is also to increase: [I] The cost of goods is climbing.
  • climb verb (MOVE)

[I always + adv/prep] to move in a way that uses your arms and legs and often involves careful control over your body: He climbed down from the ladder to get some more paint.

climbnoun [C]

 us   /klɑɪm/
  • climb noun [C] (RISE)

an act of going up: It was a long, difficult climb to the top of the hill.
(Definition of climb from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"climb" in Business English

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climbverb

uk   us   /klaɪm/
[I] if a price, number, or amount climbs, it increases: costs/prices/rates climb Our costs have climbed rapidly in the last few years. climb steadily/steeply/slowly
[I or T] to improve your position at work or in society: He quickly climbed to the top of his profession.climb the housing/promotion/corporate ladder As executives struggle to climb the corporate ladder, they often do not want to say anything that could harm their chances.

climbnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /klaɪm/
an increase in a price, number, or amount: a climb in sth A sustained climb in interest rates could hit some parts of the housing market harder than others.
a period of improvement or progress: It's going to be a long, hard climb before we get out of this recession. Her climb to the top of the profession was remarkably quick.
(Definition of climb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“climb” in British English

“climb” in American English

“climb” in Business English

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