coach Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “coach” in the English Dictionary

"coach" in British English

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coachnoun

uk   /kəʊtʃ/  us   /koʊtʃ/
  • coach noun (TEACHER)

B1 someone whose job is to teach people to improve at a sport, skill, or school subject: a tennis/maths coach
someone whose job is to train and organize a sports team : Gus Poyet was appointed as head coach.

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  • coach noun (VEHICLE)

A2 [C] (US usually bus) a long motor vehicle with comfortable seats, used to take groups of people on journeys: We're going to the airport by coach. a coach trip
[C] an old-fashioned carriage pulled by horses, now used mainly in official or royal ceremonies
[C] UK (UK also carriage, US car) any of the separate parts of a train in which the passengeras sit
[U] US →  coach class

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coachverb [I or T]

uk   /kəʊtʃ/  us   /koʊtʃ/
to train and organize a sports team: He coached the Blue Devils during their last championship season.
coaching
noun [U] uk   /ˈkəʊ.tʃɪŋ/  us   /ˈkoʊ.tʃɪŋ/
B2 You're very behind in your English - why don't you get some extra coaching?

coachnoun [U], adverb

uk   /kəʊtʃ/  us   /koʊtʃ/ US
(Definition of coach from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"coach" in American English

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coachnoun

 us   /koʊtʃ/
  • coach noun (TEACHER)

[C] (esp. in sports) a person who is responsible for managing and training a person or a team: a basketball coach
[C] A coach is also an expert who trains someone learning or improving a skill, esp. one related to performing: an acting coach
  • coach noun (PART OF VEHICLE)

[C/U] the less expensive sections of an aircraft that most people sit in: [U] We were in coach on the flight to Seattle.
[C/U] A coach is also one of the separate parts of a train.
[C/U] A coach is also a kind of old-fashioned vehicle pulled by one or more horses.
[C/U] Br A coach is a bus.

coachverb [I/T]

 us   /koʊtʃ/
to be responsible for managing and training a person or a team: [I/T] He coached the Giants until 1997.
(Definition of coach from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"coach" in Business English

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coachnoun [C]

uk   us   /kəʊtʃ/
HR, MANAGEMENT someone whose job is to provide training for people or to help prepare them for something: The company has hired a coach to improve our English.
See also

coachverb [T]

uk   us   /kəʊtʃ/
HR, MANAGEMENT to provide training or help prepare someone for something: He offered to coach me for my interview.coach sb in sth We were coached in the best ways to improve our sales figures.

coachnoun [U]

uk   us   /kəʊtʃ/ US ( UK economy) TRANSPORT
the cheapest type of seats on a plane or train: in coach The airline was one of the first to stop serving complimentary meals in coach.
coach
adverb
Even the company's director flies coach most of the time.
(Definition of coach from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“coach” in Business English

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