code Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “code” in the English Dictionary

"code" in British English

See all translations

codenoun

uk   /kəʊd/ us   /koʊd/
  • code noun (LANGUAGE)

B2 [C or U] a system of words, letters, or signs used to represent a message in secret form, or a system of numbers, letters, or signals used to represent something in a shorter or more convenient form: The message was written in code. She managed to decipher/break/crack (= succeed in understanding) the code. Each entry in this dictionary has a grammar code.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • code noun (RULES)

C1 [C] a set of rules that are accepted as general principles, or a set of written rules that say how people in a particular organization or country should behave: Clinics will be subject to a new code of conduct and stronger controls by local authorities.
[C] a set of principles that are accepted and used by society or a particular group of people: a moral code a code of behaviour/ethics

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • code noun (GENES)

specialized medical [C or U] an arrangement of genetic material in DNA (= the chemical that carries genetic information in cells): genetic codes

codeverb [T]

uk   /kəʊd/ us   /koʊd/
to represent a message in code so that it can only be understood by the person who is meant to receive it
(Definition of code from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"code" in American English

See all translations

codenoun

us   /koʊd/
  • code noun (SPECIAL LANGUAGE)

[C/U] a system for representing information with signs or symbols that are not ordinary language, or the signs or symbols themselves: [U] Andrew writes computer code. [C] Callers punch in four-digit access codes for various topics.
  • code noun (PATTERN)

biology /koʊd/ [C] genetic code
  • code noun (RULES)

[C] rules for the way people should behave, or a set of written rules or laws that tell people what to do: Faculty members are expected to follow the school’s honor code. Is there a dress code where you work? Fire codes prohibit locking classroom doors.

codeverb [T]

us   /koʊd/
to represent information in a way that is not ordinary language, as with special signs or symbols: Many areas of the brain code and store information.
coded
adjective [not gradable] us   /ˈkoʊ·dɪd/
Electronically coded cards are issued to food-stamp recipients.
(Definition of code from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"code" in Business English

See all translations

codenoun

uk   /kəʊd/ us  
[C or U] a set or system of numbers, letters, or signs which is known only to particular people and represents something that is secret: access/security code You need an access code to get into the building.in code The message was written in code.
[C] a system of words, letters, or signs which is used to represent something so that it is easy to know which thing or type of thing it is: product/identification code The FDA Product Code describes a product or a group of products. We will give you a unique code to use when you make a booking.
[U] IT the letters, numbers, words, and symbols used for writing computer programs: computer/digital code Java computer code write/generate/execute code
[C] a set of principles, or a set of rules which state how people in a particular organization, job, etc. should behave: abide by/follow a code All our members follow a strict professional code. He has his own moral code for the way he does business. a code of behaviour/conduct
[C, usually singular] LAW a set of rules or laws: the state's legal code Their aim is to work out a code to end sweatshops.
(Definition of code from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of code?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“code” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

Read More 

Word of the Day

pollution

damage caused to water, air, etc. by harmful substances or waste

Word of the Day

decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
May 30, 2016
a decreased ability to make decisions as a result of having too many decisions to make Our brains have a finite number of decisions they can make before they get depleted and become less discerning – so this is called decision fatigue.

Read More